Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness

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Infobase Publishing, 2008 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 163 pages
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Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness is not simply a critique of colonialism in the Congo; it is an examination of the human tendency toward self-endangering corruptibility. In this updated collection of critical essays, master literary scholar Harold Bloom suggests that this resonant work has taken on the power of myth.
 

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Contents

Introduction
1
Two Visions in Heart of Darkness
5
Heart of Darkness
19
The White Fog Incident in Conrads Heart of Darkness
37
Heart of Darkness and the Discourse of National Character
51
Fascination and Voice in Conrads Heart of Darkness
79
Marlow and the Russian Sailor in Conrads Heart of Darkness
95
Conrad Achebe and the Critics
105
Should We Read Heart of Darkness?
115
The Journey to the Inner Station
131
Chronology
145
Contributors
147
Bibliography
149
Acknowledgments
155
Index
157
Copyright

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About the author (2008)

Harold Bloom is Sterling Professor of the Humanities at Yale University. He is the author of 30 books, including Shelley's Mythmaking (1959), The Visionary Company (1961), Blake's Apocalypse (1963), Yeats (1970), A Map of Misreading (1975), Kabbalah and Criticism (1975), Agon: Toward a Theory of Revisionism (1982), The American Religion (1992), The Western Canon (1994), and Omens of Millennium: The Gnosis of Angels, Dreams, and Resurrection (1996). The Anxiety of Influence (1973) sets forth Professor Bloom's provocative theory of the literary relationships between the great writers and their predecessors. His most recent books include Shakespeare: The Invention of the Human (1998), a 1998 National Book Award finalist, How to Read and Why (2000), Genius: A Mosaic of One Hundred Exemplary Creative Minds (2002), Hamlet: Poem Unlimited (2003), Where Shall Wisdom be Found (2004), and Jesus and Yahweh: The Names Divine (2005). In 1999, Professor Bloom received the prestigious American Academy of Arts and Letters Gold Medal for Criticism. He has also received the International Prize of Catalonia, the Alfonso Reyes Prize of Mexico, and the Hans Christian Andersen Bicentennial Prize of Denmark.

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