Heart of darkness

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Penguin, 1984 - Fiction - 120 pages
26 Reviews
"Heart of Darkness" grew out of a journey Joseph Conrad took up the Congo River; the verisimilitude that the great novelist thereby brought to his most famous tale everywhere enhances its dense and shattering power. Apparently a sailor's yarn, it is in fact a grim parody of the adventure story, in which the narrator, Marlow, travels deep into the heart of the Congo where he encounters the crazed idealist Kurtz and discovers that the relative values of the civilized and the primitive are not what they seem. "Heart of Darkness" is a model of economic storytelling, an indictment of the inner and outer turmoil caused by the European imperial misadventure, and a piercing account of the fragility of the human soul.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Ma_Washigeri - LibraryThing

Very powerful. I already want to keep going back and dipping in to odd pages. I shall have to look out for my own copy as this one is going back to the library. The odd thing is how contemporary it ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - SandDune - LibraryThing

With only 84 pages this is very much a novella, rather than a novel, but into those 84 pages Conrad fits such a lot. There is more to think or argue about in these few pages than in most books that ... Read full review

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Critical Practice
Catherine Belsey
Limited preview - 2002
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About the author (1984)

Joseph Conrad (1857-1924) grew up amid political unrest in Russian-occupied Poland. After twenty years at sea with the French and British merchant navies, he settled in England in 1894. Over the next three decades he revolutionized the English novel with works such as Typhoon (1902), Youth (1902), Nostromo (1904), The Secret Agent (1907), Under Western Eyes (1911), Chance (1913), and Victory (1915).

"From the Trade Paperback edition.

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