Hearts Awake: The Pixy; a Play

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George H. Doran Company, 1919 - 143 pages
 

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Page 58 - Nathanael saith unto him, Whence knowest thou me? Jesus answered and said unto him, Before that Philip called thee, when thou wast under the fig tree, I saw thee.
Page 36 - When the Day that he must go hence, was come, many accompanied him to the River side, into which, as he went, he said, Death, where is thy Sting? And as he went down deeper, he said, Grave, where is thy Victory?
Page 66 - But what of thee, Endymion the mortal ? Thou must grow Less beautiful, not more, as year by year Binds leaden sandals on thy dragging feet. The vision that beholds what men call Time A little dancing mote which quivers down Among a thousand others through a beam Of light supernal, to be lost in dark — That vision is the god's, and without end His time for loving, as his power for love Without a limit. Ah, but what of thee, Endymion the mortal? Thou canst love Only a little, and a little while,...
Page 41 - THERE'S a crackle of brown on the leaf's crisp edge And the goldenrod blooms have begun to feather. We're two jolly vagabonds under a hedge By the dusty road together. Could an emperor boast such a house as ours, The sky for a roof and for couch the clover? Does he sleep as well under silken flowers As we, when the day is over? He sits at ease at his table fine With the richest of meat and drink before him. I eat my crust with your hand in mine, And your eyes are cups of a stronger wine Than any...
Page 40 - The apples falling from the tree Make such a heavy bump at night I always am surprised to see They are so little, when it's light; And all the dark just sings and sings So loud, I cannot see at all How frogs and crickets and such things That make the noise, can be so small. Then my own room looks larger, too — Corners so dark and far away — I wonder if things really do Grow up at night and shrink by day? For I dream sometimes, just as clear, I'm bigger than the biggest men — Then Mother says,...
Page 88 - My duty towards God, is to believe in Him, to fear Him, and to love Him with all my heart, with all my mind, with all my soul, and with all my strength ; to worship Him, to give Him thanks, to put my whole trust in Him, to call upon Him, to honour His holy name and His Word, and to serve Him truly all the days of my life.
Page 62 - Joyce Kilmer ARTEMIS ON LATMOS I called him to the mountain and he came. The valley drew him — ah, could I not see How slowly and reluctantly at first His feet were turned from the familiar ways? Until I stooped to him and put aside The dimness of his sight that hid my face; Then he came gladly, but with arms outstretched, Hasting with quickened breath and burning eyes, As man to woman, but I led him still A pace ahead, always a pace ahead And out of reach — and so he followed me. Now he is mine;...
Page 40 - ... when it's light; And all the dark just sings and sings So loud, I cannot see at all How frogs and crickets and such things That make the noise, can be so small. Then my own room looks larger, too — Corners so dark and far away — I wonder if things really do Grow up at night and shrink by day? For I dream sometimes, just as clear, I'm bigger than the biggest men — Then mother says, "Wake up, my dearl
Page 42 - ... couch the clover? Does he sleep as well under silken flowers As we, when the day is over? He sits at ease at his table fine With the richest of meat and drink before him, I eat my crust with your hand in mine, And your eyes are cups of a stronger wine Than any his steward can pour him. What if the autumn days grow cold? Under one cloak we can brave the weather. A comrade's troth is the Romany gold And we're taking the road together.
Page 35 - I am going to my Father's ; and although Not easily I came to where I am, My pains upon the journey were well spent. My sword I give to him who shall succeed My pilgrim steps upon the Royal Road; My courage and my skill I leave to him Who can attain them — but my marks and scars I carry with me for my King to see As witness of His battles that I fought.

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