Heartsease: Or, the Brother's Wife

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J. W. Parker and son, 1854
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Page 81 - Them that are meek shall he guide in judgment : and such as are gentle, them shall he learn his way.
Page 163 - WILL you walk into my parlour ?" said a spider to a fly; " Tis the prettiest little parlour that ever you did spy.
Page 354 - I don't know what would have become of me if I had not been a reading boy. My prep finished I would have had nothing to do but sit and watch the awful stillness of the sick room flow out through the closed door and coldly enfold my scared heart.
Page 333 - No sport of every random gust, Yet being to myself a guide, Too blindly have reposed my trust: And oft, when in my heart was heard Thy timely mandate, I deferred The task, in smoother walks to stray; But thee I now would serve more strictly, if I may.
Page 194 - A well of love, it may be deep — I trust it is, — and never dry : What matter ? if the waters sleep In silence and obscurity. Such change, and at the very door Of my fond heart, hath made me poor.
Page 356 - Ye who to serve this Lord aspire, Abhor what's ill, and truth esteem ; He'll keep his servants' souls entire, And them from wicked hands redeem.
Page 81 - All the paths of the Lord are mercy and truth, unto such as keep his covenant and his testimonies.
Page 127 - O'ER wayward childhood would'st thou hold firm rule, And sun thee in the light of happy faces ; Love, Hope, and Patience, these must be thy graces, And in thine own heart let them first keep school.
Page 52 - Still humbleness with her low-breathed voice Can steal o'er man's proud heart, and win his choice From earth to heaven, with mightier witchery Than eloquence or wisdom e'er could own.
Page 215 - Now well-a-day ! said the heir of Linne, Now well-a-day, and woe is me! For when I was the lord of Linne, I never wanted gold nor fee. But many a trusty friend have I, And why should I feel dole or care ? I 'll borrow of them all by turns, So need I not be never bare.

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