Heatstroke: Why Canada's Summer Olympic Program Is Failing -- And How We Can Fix It

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BPS Books, Sep 8, 2009 - History - 220 pages
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Heatstroke exposes the systemic causes of Canada's Summer Olympic failures against the backdrop of the country's increasing Winter Olympic success and the meteoric rise of summer athletes in Australia, a country that used to trail its northern Commonwealth cousin.

Simonson's dogged investigative work reveals the debilitating politics bubbling under the surface of Canada's Olympic movement, as well as throughout the country's amateur sport system, coaching ranks, and the athletes' own associations.

One thing is for certain: The Canadian public deserves better. Simonson shows how athletes can stand up for themselves, how the public can demand excellence, how the Olympic system can reform itself, and how politicians can develop and fund policies that produce winners. According to Simonson, Canada can and will see more of its summer athletes on Olympic podiums in the years to come.
 

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Contents

A Nation Sinks Back in Disappointment Again
7
Things Werent Always This Way
22
The Calgary Experience
30
Canadas Speed Skating Success Story
38
Canadas Recipe for Success in Vancouver 2010
49
The Sorry State of Our Olympic Efforts
57
Canadas Plans for
68
A Case Study
101
Implementing Excellence
128
Getting Canadian Athletes
145
Sharing the Blame Heading for Fame
157
Tracys View
170
Putting the Fight Back
176
Epilogue
183
Index
213
Copyright

Creating a Culture of Sport
114

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About the author (2009)

Michael G. Simonson, a former carded athlete on Canada's national rowing team, retired in 2003 after winning double silver at the Pan-American Games. Today Michael is Head Coach of the Senior Competitive Program at the Calgary Rowing Club. He also oversees all aspects of competitive rowing in Alberta as the Provincial Technical Director of the Alberta Rowing Association.

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