Heaven

Front Cover
Scholastic, 1998 - Adoption - 138 pages
Marley has lived in Heaven since she was two years old, when her mother found a postcard postmarked HEAVEN, OH on a park bench and decided that was where she wanted to raise her family.

And for twelve years, Marley's hometown has lived up to its name. She lives in a house by the river, has loving parents, a funny younger brother, good friends, and receives frequent letters from her mysterious Uncle Jack. Then one day a letter arrives form Alabama, and Marley's life is turned upside down. Marley doesn't even know who she is anymore -- but where can she go for answers, when she's been deceived by the very people she should be able to trust the most?

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - fingerpost - LibraryThing

Marley is a 14-year-old girl who lives with her parents and brother in the small town of Heaven, Ohio. Her two good friends are Shoogy Maple, a rebellious teenager in a seemingly perfect family, and ... Read full review

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User Review  - Whisper1 - LibraryThing

When 12 year old Marley discovers that she is adopted, her perception of who she is and the parents who raised her is turned upside down. Learning that her uncle is her biological father, she ... Read full review

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
28
Section 3
45
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Angela Johnson was born on June 18, 1961 in Tuskegee, Alabama. She attended Kent State University and worked with Volunteers in Service to America (VISTA) as a child development worker. She has written numerous children's books including Tell Me a Story, Mama, Shoes like Miss Alice, Looking for Red, A Cool Moonlight and Lily Brown's Paintings. She won the Coretta Scott King Author's Award three times for Toning the Sweep in 1994, for Heaven in 1999, and for The First Part Last in 2004, which also won the Michael L. Printz Award. In 2003, she was named a MacArthur fellow.

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