Heaven's my destination

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Harper & brothers, 1935 - Fiction - 304 pages
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Meet George Marvin Brush - Don Quixote come to Main Street in the Great Depression, and one of Thornton Wilder's most memorable characters. George Brush, a traveling textbook salesman, is a fervent religious convert who is determined to lead a good life. With sad and sometimes hilarious consequences, his travels take him through smoking cars, bawdy houses, banks, and campgrounds from Texas to Illinois - and into the soul of America itself.

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - gbill - LibraryThing

George Brush, traveling book salesman and purveyor of morality, is a quiet revolutionary: he’s a pacifist, believing in Gandhi’s concepts of voluntary poverty, fasting, ahimsa (compassion), and doing ... Read full review

Heaven's my destination

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Wilder is on a roll, with several of his titles coming back into print. Heaven's My Destination (1934) offers protagonist George Brush, a traveling salesman attempting to live a virtuous life despite ... Read full review

Contents

CHAPTER George Brush tries to save some souls
1
CHAPTER Oklahoma City Chiefly conversation
32
CHAPTER Good times at Camp Morgan Dick
49
Copyright

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About the author (1935)

One of the most honored and versatile of modern writers, Thornton Wilder combined a career as a successful novelist with work for the theater that made him one of this century's outstanding dramatists. It was an early short novel, however, that first brought him fame. The Bridge of San Luis Rey (1927), a bestseller that won the Pulitzer Prize in 1927, is the story of a group of assorted people who happen to be on a bridge in Peru when it collapses. Ingeniously constructed and rich in its philosophical implications about fate and synchronicity, Wilder's book would seem to be the first well-known example of a formula that has become a cliche in popular literature. His attraction to classical themes is manifested in The Woman of Andros (1930), a tragedy about young love in pre-Christian Greece, and The Ides of March (1948), set in the time of Julius Caesar and told in letters and documents covering a long span of years. Heaven's My Destination (1934), is a seriocomic and picaresque story about a young book salesman traveling through the Midwest during the early years of the Great Depression.Theophilus North (1973), Wilder's last novel, disappointed many reviewers, but it provided its author with opportunities to offer some wry observations on the life of the idle rich in Newport during the summer of 1926 and to ponder in the story of his alter ego what might have happened if Wilder had stayed home, so to speak, instead of becoming Thornton Wilder. As a serious writer of fiction, Wilder's main claim rests on The Eighth Day (1967), an intellectual thriller, which the N.Y. Times called "the most substantial fiction of his career." It won the National Book Award for fiction in 1968.

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