Helen of the Glen: A Tale of the Scotch Covenanters

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R. Carter, 1841 - English fiction - 113 pages
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Page 27 - For thou hast delivered my soul from death, mine eyes from tears, and my feet from falling.
Page 66 - The rich man shall lie down, but he shall not be gathered : he openeth his eyes, and he is not. 20 Terrors take hold on him as waters, a tempest stealeth him away in the night. 21 The east wind carrieth him away, and he departeth: and as a storm hurleth him out of his place.
Page 3 - ONE there is, above all others, Well deserves the name of Friend ; His is love beyond a brother's, Costly, free, and knows no end.
Page 3 - And all thy children shall be taught of the LORD; and great shall be the peace of thy children.
Page 75 - Thou crownest the year with thy goodness : and thy paths drop fatness. They drop upon the pastures of the wilderness ; and the little hills rejoice on every side. The pastures are clothed with flocks ; the valleys also are covered over with corn : they shout for joy, they also sing.
Page 54 - He brings, and round about him ; nor from Hell One step no more than from himself can fly By change of place : now Conscience wakes Despair That slumbered ; wakes the bitter memory Of what he was, what is, and what must be Worse; of worse deeds worse sufferings must ensue.
Page 24 - Moses lifted up the serpent in the wilderness, so is the Son of man lifted up; that whosoever believeth in him may not perish, but have everlasting life.
Page 17 - In gentle stream; then rose the song, the loud Acclaim of praise. The wheeling plover ceased Her plaint; The solitary place was glad, And on the distant cairns the watcher's ear Caught doubtfully at times the breeze-borne note.
Page 21 - If thee, Jerusalem, I forget, Skill part from my right hand. My tongue to my mouth's roof let cleave, If I do thee forget, Jerusalem, and thee above My chief joy do not set.
Page 81 - What hero, like the man who stands himself; Who dares to meet his naked heart alone ; Who hears, intrepid, the full charge it brings, Resolv'd to silence future murmurs there ? The coward flies- and, flying, is undone.

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