Hell Phone

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Harry N. Abrams, Sep 26, 2006 - Young Adult Fiction - 252 pages
3 Reviews
A murder story with a devilish twist

Nick wants a cell phone so he can talk to his girlfriend, Jen, after school, but he doesn't have a lot of money. The used phone he buys seems like a bargain, until the phone calls begin—strangers calling night and day, some begging for help, others making demands. Nick wants to get rid of the phone, but something prevents him, and, soon he finds himself committing crimes—stealing, conning . . .and killing.

Fans of William Sleator's The Boy Who Couldn't Die will enjoy this equally diabolical thriller. A murder story with a devilish twist

Nick wants a cell phone so he can talk to his girlfriend, Jen, after school, but he doesn't have a lot of money. The used phone he buys seems like a bargain, until the phone calls begin—strangers calling night and day, some begging for help, others making demands. Nick wants to get rid of the phone, but something prevents him, and, soon he finds himself committing crimes—stealing, conning . . .and killing.

Fans of William Sleator's The Boy Who Couldn't Die will enjoy this equally diabolical thriller.

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William Sleator has written this fantastic novel called Hell Phone. This book is full of excitement, suspense, and maybe a little bit of death! This book is amazing and will make anybody sit in the front of their chair, just waiting to see what will happen next.
In this book Sleator does a great job of creating a conflict. The main character in this book wants to buy a phone so he can talk to his girlfriend. But the conflict is that when Nick buys the cheapest phone in the store [which has no caller ID, is used, and when it rings it makes a sound like a cat that is being tortured] in the store, he soon learns why it costs him so little. He keeps getting phone calls from this mysterious man and a terrified lady looking for this so-called “Trang” who used to own the phone.
I hesitated, and the phone mewed at me again. I jumped. Then I pressed the green talk button.
“Hello,” I said, tentatively. “Er, listen, I think-------”
“Oh, I see,” a cool male voice interrupted me. “So the dope thought he could double-cross me. He sold it and ran away. He’s toast now,” he added calmly.
My heart was pounding. The voice sounded really icy. “Well, er, now I own this phone, so I guess, er, you’ll have to stop-----”
“So it’s going to have to be you now, whoever you are,” the suave voice interrupted me again. Then he became businesslike. “What’s your name? What’s your address? Where are you right now?”
The author uses that little part in the book to make the reader want to read on and figure out who this guy is. Sleator has the character realizing that this is no ordinary phone buy the crazy people who are calling him, the disabled caller ID, and the games on the phone that are called “GAMES FROM REAL HELL”. Soon, Sleator will have the character find out a little more about this phone that will make regret he ever bought it!
The main character that Sleator creates in this book is Nick Gordon. Nick is a seventeen year old boy living with his mom who works night and day. They are very poor and they live in a trailer. Nick is a a very good student that takes pride in his homework by doing it by hand because he can’t afford a computer. Sleator creates a character that all he wants in life is to get a scholarship to college because if he doesn’t, he’ll end up poor like his mom. But as the book goes on, Sleator creates a character that changes, a lot.
“Mommy! Mommy! Look at the at man. He’s putting stuff into his backpack. He’s stealing!”
My heart thudded; sweat dripped into my eyes and stung. I fought the impulse to look and see whom the bratty little voice was coming from. Instead I moved slowly off in the opposite direction, which was unfortunately away from the entrance. I needed to put as many people as possible between me and the obnoxious kid. I didn’t even know what he looked like, or if his mother was paying any attention to what he was telling her.
First Nick is this sweet nice kid that doesn’t do anything wrong, then he starts stealing things! William Sleator has created this amazing changing character.
While reading this book, I felt like I could not stop reading it. I read chapter 1 the first night I got it, then when I woke up the next morning I read on and on. I read for hours at a time just waiting to see what would happen next. I would always find myself forgetting about the time and start reading like there was no tomorrow, and I’m not a big reader at all! But William created this fantastic book with loads of suspense. I really hope that he comes out with a sequel.
I think that the message of this book is that “when you do something wrong, you pay the price”. I would rate this book a definite 10 star. I am in 6th grade, but most people that are in late middle school and up that love suspense and a little horror. So go out and get your hands on a copy as soon as you can!
 

Contents

Section 1
1
Section 2
9
Section 3
15
Copyright

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About the author (2006)

William Sleator was born on February 13, 1945 in Harve de Grace, Maryland. In 1967, he received a BA in English from Harvard University. He mainly wrote science fiction novels for young adults. His first novel, Blackbriar, was published in 1972. He wrote more than 30 books including House of Stairs, Interstellar Pig, The Green Futures of Tycho, Strange Attractors, The Spirit House, The Boy Who Couldn't Die, and The Phantom Limb. His picture book, The Angry Moon, won a Caldecott Award in 1971. He died on August 3, 2011 at the age of 66.

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