Hello, America

Front Cover
Simon and Schuster, 2005 - Juvenile Nonfiction - 230 pages
The year is 1951 and eighteen-year-old Elli and her mother arrive in New York City. Finally they can leave behind bitter Holocaust memories and become real Americans! From office filing all day, to the challenge of night school, to interpreting the intentions of Alex, a handsome and persistent doctor, Elli soon finds learning English is only half as hard as "making it" in this new world.

Against a backdrop of soda shops, skyscrapers, and subways, acclaimed author Livia Bitton-Jackson fuses old-world tradition and modern dreams, in this vivid kaleidoscope of immigrant America.

 

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LibraryThing Review

User Review  - Mwbordel - LibraryThing

Hello America is the story of the author Livia Bitton-Jackson who came to American after the end of WWII. Elli, eighteen years old, and her mother both survived the German concentration camp at ... Read full review

HELLO, AMERICA

User Review  - Kirkus

In the third chapter of her memoir, the author and her mother arrive in the US in 1951, after rescue from the concentration camps and several years of living an uncertain life in Europe. Elli is a ... Read full review

Selected pages

Contents

Section 1
17
Section 2
25
Section 3
72
Section 4
88
Section 5
100
Section 6
117
Section 7
135
Section 8
157
Section 9
164
Section 10
171
Section 11
184
Section 12
189
Section 13
197
Section 14
208
Copyright

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About the author (2005)

Livia Bitton-Jackson, born Elli L. Friedmann in Czechoslovakia, was thirteen when she, her mother, and her brother were taken to Auschwitz. They were liberated in 1945 and came to the United States on a refugee boat in 1951. She received a PhD in Hebrew culture and Jewish history from New York University. Dr. Bitton-Jackson has been a professor of history at City University of New York for thirty-seven years. Her previous books includeElli: Coming of Age in the Holocaust, which received the Christopher Award, the Eleanor Roosevelt Humanitarian Award, and the Jewish Heritage Award. Dr. Bitton-Jackson lives in Israel with her husband, children, and grandchildren.

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