Henry Clay Frick: The Life of the Perfect Capitalist

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McFarland, Nov 29, 2014 - Business & Economics - 270 pages
Henry Clay Frick, reviled in his own time, infamous in ours, was blamed for the Johnstown Flood (which killed 2,200 people) as well as the violent Homestead Strike of 1892, and survived an assassination attempt, yet at the same time was an ardent philanthropist, giving more than $100 million during his lifetime and in his will, while insisting on anonymity. This biography explores the contradictions in this great industrialist’s nature and avoids the extremes of both hagiography and denunciation.
 

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Contents

Prologue
1
Preface
3
A Technical Note
7
Introduction
11
A Heritage of Capitalism
19
Boyhood 1849 to 1860
26
Gray Gold
35
The Prince of Coke
45
HomesteadThe Battle
128
The Aftermath
140
The Foundation of a Great Corporation
148
Big Steel
157
United States Steel
167
The Worlds Richest Neighborhood
182
New York and the Panic of 1907
194
Final Years 19101919
205

Bessemer Convertors Strikes and Carnegie
55
The King of Coke
64
A Fox in the Henhouse
74
The Strike of 1887
84
Providence
95
Labor Disputes and Personal Setbacks
103
The RunUp to Homestead
113
An Industrial Waterloo
119
Pittsburgh Capitalism
218
The Labor Republic
225
An Organizational Genius
240
A Final Look
247
Chapter Notes
253
Bibliography
257
Index
259
Copyright

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About the author (2014)

Quentin R. Skrabec, Jr., Ph.D., is an international expert in management, manufacturing and globalization, and the author of several books on American industrial history, capitalism and notable business leaders. He lives in Maumee, Ohio.

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