Henry IV Part Two, Part 2

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Penguin Adult, Apr 7, 2005 - Literary Criticism - 264 pages
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Continuing the saga begun in Henry IV Part I, William Shakespeare's history play Henry IV Part II charts the continuing evolution of Prince Hal from roguish troublemaker to noble ruler of men. This Penguin Shakespeare edition is edited by Peter Davison with an introduction by Adrian Poole. Angered by the loss of his son in battle, the Earl of Northumberland supports another rebellion against King Henry IV, bringing the country to the brink of civil war. Sick and weary, the old King sends out his forces, including the unruly Sir John Falstaff, to meet the rebels. But as the conflict grows, he must also confront a more personal problem - how to make his reprobate son Prince Hal aware of the duties he must bear, as heir to the throne. This book contains a general introduction to Shakespeare's life and Elizabethan theatre, a separate introduction to Henry IV Part II, a chronology, suggestions for further reading, an essay discussing performance options on both stage and screen, and a commentary. William Shakespeare (1564-1616) was born to John Shakespeare and Mary Arden some time in late April 1564 in Stratford-upon-Avon. He wrote about 38 plays (the precise number is uncertain), many of which are regarded as the most exceptional works of drama ever produced, including Romeo and Juliet (1595), Henry V (1599), Hamlet (1601), Othello (1604), King Lear (1606) and Macbeth (1606), as well as a collection of 154 sonnets, which number among the most profound and influential love-poetry in English. If you enjoyed Henry IV Part II, you might like Richard III, also available in Penguin Shakespeare. 'The finest, most representative instance of what Shakespeare can do' Harold Bloom

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About the author (2005)

William Shakespeare was born in Stratford-upon-Avon in Warwickshire, and was baptised on 26 April 1564. His father was a glove maker and wool merchant and his mother, Mary Arden, was the daughter of a well-to-do local land owner. Shakespeare was probably educated in Stratford's grammar school. In 1582 he married Anne Hathaway, and the couple had a daughter the following year and twins in 1585.

Shakespeare's theatrical life seems to have commenced around 1590. We do know that he was part of the Lord Chamberlain's Company, which was renamed the King's Company in 1603 when James I succeeded to the throne. The Company acquired interests in two theatres in the Southwark area of London, near the banks of the Thames - the Globe and the Blackfriars.

Shakespeare's poetry was published before his plays, with two poems appearing in 1593 and 1594, dedicated to his patron Henry Wriothesley, Earl of Southampton. Most of Shakespeare's sonnets were probably written at this time as well.

Records of Shakespeare's plays begin to appear in 1594, and he produced roughly two a year until around 1611. His earliest plays includeHenry VIandTitus Andronicus. A Midsummer Night's Dream, The Merchant of Venice and Richard IIall date from the mid to late 1590s. Some of his most famous tragedies were written in the early 1600s; these include Hamlet, Ot

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