Henry V the Graphic Novel - Plain Text: British Edition

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Classical Comics, 2007 - Drama - 144 pages
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The complete play translated into plain English. It's the 15th century and the Archbishop of Canterbury, worried over impending legislation that would effectively rob the Church in England of its power and wealth, convinces Henry V to forego this pursuit in favour of laying claim to France. Armed with a legal technicality, Henry means to take the throne of France by whatever means necessary. The Dauphin's insulting response (sending an ambassador with a gift of tennis balls) convinces Henry that the French will only respond to war. He gathers his army to invade France, but he must also make certain that he leaves enough troops in England to quell any potential rebellions. This leaves him with a relatively small invasion force. Henry must deal with one plot before even crossing the Channel. Lords Cambridge, Scroop and Grey are discovered to be conspiring to assassinate Henry (instigated by the French). Henry makes a very public example of all three, arresting them in person and seeing to their execution.The army then lays siege to Harfleur, capturing it after heavy losses. Henry wants to take his army out of France before the onset of Winter, but the French are certain they can teach the young king a humiliating lesson on the field of battle. This stiffens Henry's resolve and he decides that, if the French want a decisive battle, they'll get it! While in camp, Henry disguises himself as a common soldier and mingles with his troops before the battle. He talks candidly with his men and they with him. The men may be a little wary of their king, but their willingness to fight the French army is undaunted. Next day at Agincourt, Henry makes the stirring St. Crispin's Day speech, knowing his army is outnumbered five to one. But, aided by the longbows of his archers, Henry wins the day.The French sue for
 

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Contents

Act 4
72
Scene 2
87
Scene 4
96
Act 5
117
Epilogue
134
Page Creation
141

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About the author (2007)

William Shakespeare, 1564 - 1616 Although there are many myths and mysteries surrounding William Shakespeare, a great deal is actually known about his life. He was born in Stratford-Upon-Avon, son of John Shakespeare, a prosperous merchant and local politician and Mary Arden, who had the wealth to send their oldest son to Stratford Grammar School. At 18, Shakespeare married Anne Hathaway, the 27-year-old daughter of a local farmer, and they had their first daughter six months later. He probably developed an interest in theatre by watching plays performed by traveling players in Stratford while still in his youth. Some time before 1592, he left his family to take up residence in London, where he began acting and writing plays and poetry. By 1594 Shakespeare had become a member and part owner of an acting company called The Lord Chamberlain's Men, where he soon became the company's principal playwright. His plays enjoyed great popularity and high critical acclaim in the newly built Globe Theatre. It was through his popularity that the troupe gained the attention of the new king, James I, who appointed them the King's Players in 1603. Before retiring to Stratford in 1613, after the Globe burned down, he wrote more than three dozen plays (that we are sure of) and more than 150 sonnets. He was celebrated by Ben Jonson, one of the leading playwrights of the day, as a writer who would be "not for an age, but for all time," a prediction that has proved to be true. Today, Shakespeare towers over all other English writers and has few rivals in any language. His genius and creativity continue to astound scholars, and his plays continue to delight audiences. Many have served as the basis for operas, ballets, musical compositions, and films. While Jonson and other writers labored over their plays, Shakespeare seems to have had the ability to turn out work of exceptionally high caliber at an amazing speed. At the height of his career, he wrote an average of two plays a year as well as dozens of poems, songs, and possibly even verses for tombstones and heraldic shields, all while he continued to act in the plays performed by the Lord Chamberlain's Men. This staggering output is even more impressive when one considers its variety. Except for the English history plays, he never wrote the same kind of play twice. He seems to have had a good deal of fun in trying his hand at every kind of play. Shakespeare wrote 154 sonnets, all published on 1609, most of which were dedicated to his patron Henry Wriothsley, The Earl of Southhampton. He also wrote 13 comedies, 13 histories, 6 tragedies, and 4 tragecomedies. He died at Stratford-upon-Avon April 23, 1616, and was buried two days later on the grounds of Holy Trinity Church in Stratford. His cause of death was unknown, but it is surmised that he knew he was dying.

John McDonald has researched the history of the Halton area since 1970, an interest which started when he began inquiring into the Limehouse and Dolly Varden areas where he spent his youth as the eldest of nine children. As a boy he felt the presence of the past as he roamed through old ruins of lime kilns and mills, which motivated him to collect old photographs and memorabilia and to write about local people and places.

A founding member of the Esquesing Historical Society and former member of Halton Hills and Halton Region Councils, John takes a keen interest in the community and has helped to awaken a new interest in this area's history.

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