Her Great Idea, and Other Stories

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H. Holt and Company, 1888 - English fiction - 243 pages
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Page 88 - ... Sybil's mother, who thought hardly anybody could ever be good enough to touch the hem of her daughter's garment, drew up her own beautiful neck at the bare idea of Godfrey, and she and her husband finally agreed together in parental conclave that a dinner party— a formal, frigid, stately dinner party, at which all the old silver and china should be in use, and for which the invitations should be issued weeks beforehand — was the only suitable, sensible, and rational mode of celebrating their...
Page 104 - You are a good woman," said Sir Robert, who had listened to every word of the harangue. " You — you are a good woman." There was something in his tone which made Lady Diana look up. " Sybil is very pretty," said she softly. " Very pretty." " And quite tall enough for so slight a figure." "Quite tall enough." "If she were only better dressed." Sir Robert smiled. " I say, if she were only better dressed, Sir Robert ; but no doubt you think that is only a woman's notion." "No, indeed, Lady Diana,...
Page 86 - Trifles make the sum of human things." SYBIL was to dine late. She had never dined late in her life before. That is not to say that Miss Sybil Latimer had never been present during a part or even the whole of that solemn function ushered in nightly by the roll of the gong at eight o'clock. Sybil was an only child, and had her...
Page 112 - ... from her parted lips. And then, to be sure, the fairy robe itself was not all. There were besides tiny, sparkling, beaded, white satin slippers, such slippers as Cinderella's prince might himself have fallen in love with ; and there were a pair of the longest, softest, most delicately perfumed gloves, gloves that would certainly reach to Sybil's elbow, if not beyond ; and best, because least expected of all — for Lady Georgina's orders had been lavish, but had for this occasion been entrusted...
Page 120 - Come and enter the drawing-room with me, and — and — God bless you, my darling!" whispered the poor fond mother, with the water rising to her eyes. For once she had not a single fault to find. For once Sybil neither shrank nor shrivelled beneath the eyes turned upon her as she walked up the great saloon. Sir Robert Dovercourt was already there — she was glad he was there. He looked at her — she was glad he should look. He spoke to her — and she was proud to be spoken to. " Looks really...
Page 137 - I confess 1 thought you'd leave that seething mess For just one day. I see it's hopeless. Well, God bless You anyway.
Page 106 - Robert is poor, but his family is as good as oui own ; so some of the Latimer money may very well flow into the Dovercourt coffers. He is very nice — he is more, he is delightful — and so comfortably stupid that they would all get on together like a house on fire. A brilliant man, even an ordinarily clever one, would never put up with Henry — never for a moment. But poor dear Sir Robert, with his round face and simple blue eyes— I think they rather lit up as he listened to me," and she smiled...
Page 111 - Hints had, however, been dropped that even in her parents' eyes appearance was now to a certain extent to be held of consequence, and Sybil trod on air. At last, at last, she was to be as others were, wear what they wore, and turn and step about without that terrible consciousness of being followed by curious and derisive glances, which had permeated her life hitherto. At last — perhaps, at last — one pair of eyes might look not only on her, but on her trappings, with all the ignorant but delightful...
Page 129 - ... in a tone that had admitted of no remonstrance. He was now explaining his theory on the subject to the matrons on either side. But Sybil, what befell her? How did she comport herself? How did she endure the luckless moment ? " Milk, by Jove ! " cried a laughing voice in her ear. " Milk, I declare ! Is it for you, Sybil ? Is that your fancy ? " (Her fancy, poor child !) " Well, upon my word, it is a splendid idea," pursued Sir Robert, talking comfortably away; "looks jolly, and tastes first-rate,...
Page 98 - Lady Diana would not answer him a word, but Sybil almost fancied a caress in the hand laid upon her own humbled, drooping little shoulders presently. Again it would be the anxious restrictions, cautions, and reminders of her fond guardians which, well enough for a child of six, embittered the ear of the maiden of sixteen. If Sybil were lunching out — for this dissipation in a sociable neighborhood would now and again be permitted under the loving care and surveillance of the elderly couple —...

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