Herbart and the Herbartian Theory of Education: A Citicism

Front Cover
Longmans, Green, and Company, 1903 - Education - 148 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 78 - Heaven lies about us in our infancy ! Shades of the prison-house begin to close Upon the growing Boy, But he beholds the light, and whence it flows, He sees it in his joy; The Youth, who daily farther from the East Must travel, still is Nature's Priest, And by the vision splendid Is on his way attended ; At length the Man perceives it die away, And fade into the light of common day.
Page 84 - The mind is a kind of theatre, where several perceptions successively make their appearance, pass, repass, glide away, and mingle in an infinite variety of postures and situations.
Page 50 - In a many-sided interest," says Kern, " the pupil •should find a moral support and protection against the servitude that springs from the rule of desire and passion. It should protect him from the errors that are the consequence of idleness; it should arm him against the fitful chances of fortune; it should make life again valuable and desirable, even when a cruel fate has robbed it of its most cherished object; it should enable one to find a new calling...
Page 16 - Freedom of the Will, in psychology, is the assured supremacy of the strongest masses of ideas over single affections or impressions.
Page 50 - ... passion. It should protect him from the errors that are the consequence of idleness; it should arm him against the fitful chances of fortune; it should make life again valuable and desirable, even when a cruel fate has robbed it of its most cherished object; it should enable one to find a new calling if driven from the old; it should elevate him to a standpoint from which the goods and successes of earthly striving appear as the accidental, by which his real self is not affected, and above which...
Page 100 - But it verily means nothing more than the act of taking a thing into the mind. It corresponds to nothing peculiar or elementary in psychology, being only one of the innumerable results of the psychological process of association of ideas; and psychology itself can easily dispense with the word, useful as it may be in pedagogics.
Page 12 - Everything further that happens in it, the formation of its conceptions, the development of the various faculties, the settlement of the principles on which it acts, are all mechanical results which, when once these primary self-preservations have been aroused, follow from their own reactions; and the soul, the arena on which all this takes place, never shows itself volcanic and irritable...
Page 65 - ... different emphasis on these three divisions. Some regard the theory of ethics as the most important of the three, and maintain that Herbart's contribution here is of value even if his theory of psycho24 logy is false.1 Others consider that his theory of ethics depends on his views about psychology and that 'without a knowledge of the latter it is impossible to understand the former'.2 It seems probable that actually his theories of ethics and psychology affected each other, and we shall therefore...
Page 93 - ... will' of the person is nothing but a collective name. As Hume said, the ideas are themselves the actors, the stage, the theatre, the spectators, and the play. This is the so-called ' associationist' psychology, brought down to its radical expression: it is useless to ignore its power as a conception. Like all conceptions, when they become clear and lively enough, this conception has a strong tendency to impose itself upon belief ; and psychologists trained on biological lines usually adopt it...
Page 34 - ... process by which newly entering presentations or ideas are "assimilated, ordered, formed, and in part altered" by the ideas already present in the mind. The importance of his work in this connection should be fully recognized. He makes use of the term 'Apperception' to designate the general process by which individual perceptions, ideas or complexes of ideas, are brought into relation to our previously existing system of ideas, and, assimilating with them, are raised to greater clearness and...

Bibliographic information