Hereditary property justified: Reply to Reply to Brownson's article on the laboring classes. By one, whose personal experience should enable him to feel the wants, and sympathize with the condition, of the laborer ...

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Cambridge press: Metcalf, Torry, and Ballou, 1841 - Law - 51 pages
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Page 19 - I suppose to be self-evident, that the earth belongs in usufruct to the living : that the dead have neither powers nor rights over it. The portion occupied by any individual ceases to be his when himself ceases to be, and reverts to the society.
Page 18 - ... ought also to cease of course. For, naturally speaking, the instant a man ceases to be, he ceases to have any dominion : else, if he had a right to dispose of his acquisitions one moment beyond his life, he would also have a right to diref t their disposal for a million of ages after him : which would be highly absurd and inconvenient.
Page 19 - Property and law are born together, and die together. Before laws were made there was no property; take away laws, and property ceases.
Page 17 - Property, both in lands and movables, being thus originally acquired by the first taker, which taking amounts to a declaration that he intends to appropriate the thing to his own use, it remains in him, by the principles of universal law, till such time as he does some other act which shows an intention to abandon it; for then it becomes, naturally speaking, publici juris (of public right) once more, and is liable to be again appropriated by the next occupant.
Page 18 - The most universal and effectual way of abandoning property is by the death of the occupant ; when, both the actual possession and intention of keeping possession ceasing, the property, which is founded upon such possession and intention, ought also to cease of course. For, naturally speaking, the instant a man ceases to be, he ceases to have any dominion ; else, if he had a right to dispose of his acquisitions one moment beyond...
Page 18 - ... also have a right to direct their disposal for a million of ages after him ; which would be highly absurd and inconvenient. All property must therefore cease upon death, considering men as absolute individuals, and unconnected with civil society...
Page 46 - equality against privilege," say the Worcester Convention, but how can this be done without abolishing hereditary property ? Hereditary property is either a privilege or it is not. If it is not, if it confer no social advantage on him who inherits it over him who does not, then there can be no harm in seeking to abolish it ; for what we propose to abolish is declared to be valueless. If it be a privilege, then we must labor to abolish it, or cease to go with a party whose motto is
Page 14 - ... includes all they propose, and more too. Ours includes that, without which theirs would accomplish little. With this view of the case, it becomes necessary to seek something more ultimate, more radical than our most approved reformers have as yet ventured upon. This something we have professed to find in the abolition of hereditary property, a measure foreshadowed in the first number of this Journal...
Page 7 - Civil government supposes, in the case of each individual, a perfectly separate and independent dominion over his own affairs, with which it does not and cannot interfere.

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