Heritage

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George H. Doran Company, 1919 - Eccentrics and eccentricities - 320 pages
 

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Page 113 - Give me a spirit that on this life's rough sea Loves to have his sails fill'd with a lusty wind Even till his sail-yards tremble, his masts crack, And his rapt ship runs on her side so low That she drinks water, and her keel ploughs air; There is no danger to a man that knows What life and death is, — there's not any law Exceeds his knowledge ; neither is it lawful That he should stoop to any other law.
Page 113 - Give me a spirit that on life's rough sea Loves to have his sails fill'd with a lusty wind, Even till his sail-yards tremble, his masts crack, And his rapt ship run on her side so low, That she drinks water, and her keel ploughs air. There is no danger to a man, that knows What life and death is : there's not any law Exceeds his knowledge ; neither is it lawful That he should stoop to any other law : He goes before them, and commands them all, That to himself is a law rational.
Page 302 - What am I to believe? that she is cursed with a dual nature, the one coarse and unbridled, the other delicate, conventional, practical, motherly, refined? Have I hit the nail on the head? And is it, can it be, the result of the separate, antagonistic strains in her blood, the southern and the northern legacy?
Page 17 - Malory relates the story of his past, a series of experiences that took place in Kent, England. Malory had decided to try farming; for in his own words, I have a great love for the country people; they are to me like the oaks of the land, enduring and indigenous, beautiful with the beauty of strong, deep-rooted things, without intention of change. I love in them the store of country knowledge which they distil as resin from the pine, in natural order, with the revolving seasons. I love the unconsciousness...
Page 14 - On page 3 of her novel Miss Sackville West makes an interesting comment: I should like to explain here that those who look for facts and events as the central points of significance in a tale will be disappointed. On the other hand I may fall upon an audience which, like myself, contends that the vitality of human beings is to be judged less by their achievement than by their endeavour, by the force of their emotion rather than by their success. These are not extraordinary words; but we are inclined...
Page 14 - She has another comment: Little of any moment occurs in my story, yet behind it all I am aware of tremendous forces at work which none have rightly understood, neither the actors nor the onlookers. That is easily said. We have heard it so often of late that we are grown a little suspicious, and almost to believe that these are dangerous words for a writer to use. They are a dark shield in his hand when he ought to carry a bright weapon.
Page 63 - ... how in the subsequent generations the common brown house mouse predominated, but every now and then there came a mouse that waltzed and waltzed, restless and tormented, until in the endless pursuit of its tail it died, dazed, blinded, perplexed, by the relentless fate that had it in grip. Well, I had my mice in a cage, and Concha, the dancer, the waltzing mouse, sat mumbling by the fire.
Page 85 - The central theme of the story is really the mutual attraction and repulsion felt by Ruth and Rawdon — two facets of V SW's character. Ruth says, "He cringes to me, and then I bully him; or else he bullies me, and then I cringe to him. But quarrel as we may, we always come together again.
Page 63 - I could not help feeling that fate had her hand on these people, and mocked and pushed them hither and thither in the thin disguise of heredity. You remember Francis Galton and the waltzing mice — how he took the common mouse and the waltzing mouse, and mated them, and how among their progeny there were a common mouse, a black and white mouse, and a mouse that waltzed ; and how in subsequent generations the common brown mouse predominated, but every now and then there came a mouse that waltzed...
Page 316 - There, it's over,' he wailed, 'don't be afraid, Ruth, I won't touch you. Only let me go away now; it's this life has done for me. I can't live with you. You can keep the children, you can keep the farm; I'm going away, right away, where you'll never hear of me again. Only let me go.

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