Herland and Selected Stories

Front Cover
Signet Classic, 1992 - Fiction - 349 pages
4 Reviews
At the turn of the century, Charlotte Perkins Gilman was a celebrity—acclaimed as a leader in the feminist movement and castigated for her divorce, her relinquishment of custody of her daughter, and her unconventional second marriage. She was also widely read, with stories in popular magazines and with dozens of books in print. But her most famous short story, the intensely personal "The Yellow Wallpaper," read as a horror story when first published in 1891 and lapsed into obscurity before being rediscovered and reinterpreted by feminist scholars in the 1970s, and her landmark feminist utopian novel, Herland, remained unavailable for more than sixty years.

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User Review  - aethercowboy - LibraryThing

Herland is the feminist response to Utopia. Set as a bit of adventure fiction featuring three strapping gentlemen who discover a strange island devoid of men, populated only by women. The land is a ... Read full review

LibraryThing Review

User Review  - sussabmax - LibraryThing

Herland was part of my effort to read more science fiction classics. Gilman has a rather bracing tone in her fiction, as a rule, and that was quite evident in the short novel. I have read other ... Read full review

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About the author (1992)

Charlotte Perkins Gilman was born in 1860 in Hartford, Conn. Her traumatic childhood led to depression and to her eventual suicide. Gilman's father abandoned the family when she was a child and her mother, who was not an affectionate woman, recruited relatives to help raise her children. Among these relatives was Harriet Beecher Stowe, the author of Uncle Tom's Cabin. Due to her family situation, Gilman learned independence, but also became alienated from her many female relatives. Gilman married in 1884 and was soon diagnosed with depression. She was prescribed bed rest, which only seemed to aggravate her condition and she eventually divorced her husband, fearing that marriage was partly responsible for her depressed state. After this, Gilman became involved in feminist activities and the writing that made her a major figure in the women's movement. Books such as Women and Economics, written in 1898, are proof of her importance as a feminist. Here she states that only when women learn to be economically independent can true equality be achieved. Her fiction works, particularly The Yellow Wallpaper, are also written with feminist ideals. A frequent lecturer, she also founded the feminist magazine Forerunner in 1909. Gilman, suffering from cancer, chose to end her own life and committed suicide on August 17, 1935. More information about this fascinating figure can be found in her book The Living of Charlotte Perkins Gilman: An Autobiography, published in 1935.

Barbara H. Solomon is Professor of English and Women's Studies at Iona college. Among the books she has edited are "The Awakening and Selected Stories of Kate Chopin," "Herland and Selected Stories of Charlotte Perkins Gilman," and "Once Upon a Childhood: Stories and Memoirs of American Youth" (with Eileen Panetta.) She lives in New Rochelle, New York.
Eileen Panetta is Associate Professor of English at Iona College. She is coeditor of "Once Upon a Childhood "(with Barbara H. Solomon). She lives in New York City.

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