Hermeneutics. Method and Methodology

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Springer Science & Business Media, Nov 6, 2007 - Philosophy - 276 pages
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The goal of the investigation is a phenomenological theory of the methods and later the methodology of the human sciences, first of all the philological interpretation of texts. The first part is a critical reflection on the historical development of hermeneutics as method of interpreting texts and the tradition including the first steps toward the emergence of scientific methodological hermeneutics. Such reflections show that the development of hermeneutics is onesidedly founded in the development of hermeneutical consciousness, i.e. the changing attitudes in the application and rejection of cultural traditions. All methods and finally methodologies are onesidedly founded in the activities of the lifeworld. The second part is a first attempt to develop an outline of a general phenomenological theory of pre-methodical and methodical understanding in the lifeworld. The third part offers a critical phenomenologically guided analysis of methodological hermeneutics.

 

 

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Contents

General Introduction
1
The Development of Hermeneutical Consciousness
5
The Development of Hermeneutical Consciousness in Classical Antiquity and the Middle Ages
10
2 The philologicalrhetorical syndrome
12
3 The exegetichomiletic syndrome
20
4 The development of hermeneutic consciousness in the Middle Ages
25
The Genesis of PhilologicalHistorical Hermeneutics
34
6 Hermeneutics in the age of rationalism and the Enlightenment
41
The Unsolved Problems of Methodological Hermeneutics
155
21 The theory of the levels of hermeneutics
158
22 The second canon and its problems
161
23 The first canon and its problems
167
Parts Wholes and Circles
169
25 The theory of the whole and the parts
174
26 The wholes and parts of texts and their meaning in premethodical reading
178
27 Methodical interpretation and the two abstractive reductions
183

7 The historical school and the emergence of philologicalhistorical hermeneutics
46
Methodological Hermeneutics
55
9 Boeckhs critics and Dilthey
61
10 Droysens theory of historical interpretation and critique
69
11 Archaeological hermeneutics
85
Toward a General Theory of Understanding
93
A Typology of Understanding
98
13 Elementary understanding
105
14 Higher understanding and cultural tradition
116
Cultural Understanding 15 Preliminary remarks
125
16 Nonliterary cultural traditions
126
17 Texts and speeches
132
18 Archaic cultures and archaic intercultural encounters
140
19 The development of literary traditions and the advent of hermeneutical reflection
144
Method and Methodology
153
28 Grammatical interpretation
185
29 Genre interpretation
196
30 Summary and transition
209
The First Canon and the PhilologicalHistorical Method
218
32 The original givenness of the past in remembering and memory
220
33 Agreement and disagreement understanding misunderstanding and not understanding in dialogues
222
34 Dialogues between correspondents
227
35 The model of the stemma
229
36 New formulations for the first canon
232
37 Efficient history and the consciousness of efficient history
237
Concluding Remarks
245
Bibliography
251
Index
263
Index of technical terms
265
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