High Art Lite: British Art in the 1990s

Front Cover
Verso, 2001 - Art - 342 pages
High Art Lite takes a cool and critical look at the way in which British art in the 1990s has reinvented itself, successfully appealing both to the mass media and to the elite art world. In this extensively illustrated polemic, Julian Stallabrass asks whether it has done so at the price of dumbing down and selling out. 18 color and 53 b/w photographs.
 

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HIGH ART LITE

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A full-throated attack on the —new British art,— a movement obsessed with commerce and cults of the personal, that manages to be smarter and more far-reaching than its hyped, hopped-up subject ... Read full review

High art lite: British art in the 1990s

User Review  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Stallabrass, a writer, art critic, and art history professor, takes a close look at the movement he dubs "high art lite" (also known as Young British Art) that has developed in Britain over the past ... Read full review

Contents

I
1
II
15
III
17
IV
49
V
84
VI
125
VII
127
VIII
170
X
223
XI
225
XII
258
XIII
273
XIV
296
XV
323
XVI
335
Copyright

IX
196

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Popular passages

Page 323 - Pierre Bourdieu, Distinction: A Social Critique of the Judgement of Taste, trans. Richard Nice (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1984); and Pierre Bourdieu, The Field of Cultural Production, ed.

References to this book

About the author (2001)

Julian Stallabrass is Reader in art history at the Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London. His other books include Art Incorporated: The Story of Contemporary Art, Gargantua: Manufactured Mass Culture, and Internet Art: The Online Clash of Culture and Commerce.

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