High Definition Television: The Creation, Development and Implementation of HDTV Technology

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McFarland, Jan 9, 2012 - Social Science - 384 pages
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The 40-year history of high definition television technology is traced from initial studies in Japan, through its development in Europe, and then to the United States, where the first all-digital systems were implemented. Details are provided about advances in HDTV technology in Australia and Japan, Europe's introduction of HDTV, Brazil's innovative use of MPEG-4 and China's terrestrial standard. The impact of HDTV on broadcast facility conversion and the influx of computer systems and information technology are described, as well as the contributions of the first entrepreneurial HD videographers and engineers. This thoroughly researched volume highlights several of the landmark high-definition broadcasts from 1988 onward, includes input gathered from more than 50 international participants, and concludes with the rollout of consumer HDTV services throughout the world.
 

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Contents

Foreword by Bernard S Finn
1
Preface
3
Introduction
5
Abbreviations
7
1 Being There
13
2 Road Blocked
27
3 TechnoIndustrial War
50
4 Americas International Competition
71
9 On the Appointed Day
209
10 HDs Highlight Moment
234
11 A Resolution Renaissance
259
12 An Unknown Factor
278
13 Exceeds All Expectations
300
Afterword
312
Notes
315
Annotated Bibliography
343

5 AllDigital Makes the Scene
96
6 Domestic Tranquility
130
7 For the Greater Good
164
8 Launch Preparations
182
References
349
Index
361
Copyright

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About the author (2012)

Philip J. Cianci worked with HDTV systems at Philips Research USA and ESPN, was the editor of Broadcast Engineering magazine's e-newsletter Transition to Digital from 2005 through 2007, and is the author of two books about television technology. He lives in Lake Peekskill, New York.

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