Higher Pay in Hard-to-staff Schools: The Case for Financial Incentives

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Scarecrow Press, 2003 - Education - 91 pages
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There are not enough highly qualified teachers willing to work in schools that serve large concentrations of poor and minority students. Only a few states have developed targeted incentive programs to direct quality teachers to high-poverty, low-performing schools where they are needed most. This book argues that changing the way that teachers are paid and offering targeted financial incentives to teachers willing to take on more difficult assignments is a critical part of an overall strategy to attract and retain highly qualified teachers in the nation's most challenging schools. Features: . Presents a workable solution ensuring every child a high-quality teacher. . Explains why teachers with the least experience and training are disproportionately concentrated in schools that serve students with the greatest educational needs. . Explains why changing the way teachers are paid is a necessary part of an overall strategy to attract and retain quality teachers in hard-to-staff schools. . An extensive review of local, state, and federal financial incentive programs that are currently offered to teachers and principals. . Research-based recommendations to guide educational and political leaders who are contemplating using monetary incentives as a recruitment and retention strategy. Will be of interest to educators, school system leaders, and policymakers."
 

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Contents

THE CASE FOR FINANCIAL INCENTIVES
1
TYPES OF FINANCIAL INCENTIVES
31
CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
61
RESOURCES ON THE WEB
71
REFERENCES
79
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
91
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About the author (2003)

Cynthia D. Prince is currently the director of Teacher Professional Development for the Council of Chief State School Officers.

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