Hints to Company Officers on Their Military Duties

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D. Van Nostrand, 1863 - 59 pages
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Page 47 - Instant, through copse and heath, arose Bonnets and spears and bended bows; On right, on left, above, below, Sprung up at once the lurking foe; From shingles grey their lances start, The bracken bush sends forth the dart, The rushes and the willow-wand Are bristling into axe and brand, And every tuft of broom gives life To plaided warrior armed for strife.
Page 57 - God's will! I pray thee, wish not one man more. By Jove, I am not covetous for gold, Nor care I who doth feed upon my cost; It...
Page 47 - From crag to crag the signal flew. Instant, through copse and heath, arose Bonnets, and spears, and bended bows; On right, on left, above, below, Sprung up at once the lurking foe. From shingles grey their lances start, The bracken bush sends forth the dart, The rushes and the willow wand Are bristling into axe and brand, And every tuft of broom gives life To plaided warrior arm'd for strife.
Page 1 - We few, we happy few, we band of brothers ; For he to-day that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother ; be he ne'er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition...
Page 23 - Add a step to it," is applicable to everything in life. Napier took the right method of inspiring his men with his own heroic spirit. He worked as hard as any private in the ranks. " The great art of commanding," he said, " is to take a fair share of the work. The man •who leads an army cannot succeed unless his whole mind is thrown into his work. The more trouble, the more labor must be given ; the more danger, the more pluck must be shown, till all is overpowered.
Page 26 - ... was formed, applied itself with energy and exemplary assiduity to the duties of that station. " In the school of regimental duty, he obtained that correct knowledge of his profession so essential to the proper direction of the gallant spirit of the soldier ; and he was enabled to establish a characteristic order and regularity of conduct, because the troops found in their leader a striking example of the discipline which he enforced on others.
Page 28 - I saw him late in the evening of that great day, when the advancing flashes of cannon and musketry stretching as far as the eye could command showed in the darkness how well the field was won ; he was alone, the flush of victory was on his brow and his eyes were eager and watchful, but his voice was calm and even gentle. More than the rival of Marlborough, since he had defeated greater generals than Marlborough ever encountered, with a prescient pride he seemed only to accept this glory as an earnest...
Page 49 - I wish to know the name of the man whose blanket this is." "It is Duncan Roy's, of the 42d, Sir Ralph." " Then see that Duncan Roy gets his blanket this very night.
Page 45 - I owe all my success in life to having been always a quarter of an hour before my time.
Page 49 - It is only a soldier's blanket, Sir Ralph.' ' Only a soldier's blanket, Sir !' said the old man, fixing his eye severely on him. ' Whose blanket is it?

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