Hints to Parents: In Two Parts

Front Cover
Whipple and Lawrence, 1825 - Child development - 72 pages
0 Reviews
 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Selected pages

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 61 - Slaves cannot breathe in England ; if their lungs Receive our air, that moment they are free ; They touch our country, and their shackles fall. That's noble, and bespeaks a nation proud And jealous of the blessing. Spread it then, And let it circulate through every vein Of all your empire ; that, where Britain's power Is felt, mankind may feel her mercy too.
Page 31 - Many examples may be put of the force of custom, both upon mind and body ; therefore, since custom is the principal magistrate of man's life, let men, by all means, endeavor to obtain good customs. Certainly, custom is most perfect when it beginneth in young years : this we call education, which is, in effect, but an early custom.
Page 63 - FROM Greenland's icy mountains, From India's coral strand; Where Afric's sunny fountains Roll down their golden sand; From many an ancient river, From many a palmy plain, They call us to deliver Their land from error's chain.
Page 48 - Come, let us go forth into the fields, let us see how the flowers spring, let us listen to the warbling of the birds, and sport ourselves upon the new grass. The winter is over and gone, the buds come out upon the trees, the crimson blossoms of the peach and the nectarine are seen, and the green leaves sprout. The hedges are bordered with tufts of primroses, and yellow cowslips that hang down their heads; and the blue violet lies hid beneath the shade.
Page 65 - It's no in making muckle, mair : It's no in books, it's no in lear, To make us truly blest : If happiness hae not her seat And centre in the breast, We may be wise, or rich, or great, But never can be blest : Nae treasures, nor pleasures, Could make us happy lang ; The heart ay's the part ay, That makes us right or wrang. Think ye, that sic as you and I, Wha drudge and drive thro...
Page 68 - It was the calmness of an intensity, kept uniform by the nature of the human mind forbidding it to be more, and by the character of the individual forbidding it to be less.
Page 63 - What though the spicy breezes Blow soft o'er Ceylon's isle, Though every prospect pleases, And only man is vile ; In vain with lavish kindness The gifts of God are strown; The heathen in his blindness Bows down to wood and stone.
Page 52 - ... strike through your eyelids, begin the day with praising God, who hath taken care of you through the night. Flowers, when you open again, spread your leaves, and smell sweet to His praise. Birds, when you awake, warble your thanks amongst the green boughs; sing to Him before you sing to your mates.
Page 69 - It implied' an inconceivable severity of conviction that he had one thing to do, and that he who would do some great thing in this short life, must apply himself to the work with such a concentration of his forces, as, to idle spectators who live only to amuse themselves, looks like insanity.
Page 51 - I will praise God with my voice ; for I may praise him, though I am but a little child. A few years ago, and I was a little infant, and my tongue was dumb within my mouth : And I did not know the great name of God, for my reason was not come unto me. But now I can speak, and my tongue shall praise him : I can think of all his kindness, and my heart shall love him.

Bibliographic information