Hipparcos, the New Reduction of the Raw Data

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Springer Science & Business Media, Sep 27, 2007 - Science - 449 pages
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Thepublication oftheHipparcos andTycho Catalogues in 1997 transformed astrometry, and as a consequence astronomers’ perception of astrometry. What had before often been regarded as a somewhat quaint specialty of limited re- vance to modern astrophysics, was suddenly seen to produce a wealth of data of immediate practical use. The ready availability of many thousand precise trigonometric stellar distances and the access to an accurate and dense - tical reference frame have changed the way astronomers think about certain problems and plan their experiments. Inevitably, the exploitation of so much new data not only solved some old problems, tidied up several confused areas and sharpened many observational constraints, but it also generated new qu- tions about established theory – and about the data themselves. The author of this book has taken a radical approach to answer some of these questions: a complete re-examination of the satellite data and the models used to represent them, in particular the attitude modelling. Eventually this resulted in the new and very signi?cantly improved Hipparcos reduction described in this book. This remarkable achievement was made possible by a combination of many factors, including time and the exponential growth of computing power, but mainly an incredible amount of detailed, tedious and ingenious work by the author and the resulting insight into what really went on with the satellite in its unhappy orbit. Dr.
 

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Contents

THE HIPPARCOS MISSION
3
12 The mission
17
13 The published data
25
14 Concepts of the new reduction
31
HIPPARCOS ASTROMETRY
39
22 The Hipparcos astrometric data
46
23 Reconstruction of the alongscan rotation phase
56
24 Grid distortions
58
93 Magnetic torques and the remaining torque variations
249
94 Predictability of the environmental torques
251
FULLYDYNAMIC ATTITUDE FITTING
254
102 The integration engines
257
103 Implementing the gyro data
260
104 Implementing the star mapper data
263
105 Implementing the IDT transit data
269
106 Conclusions
282

25 Astrometricparameter solutions
63
EXPLORING THE HIPPARCOS ASTROMETRIC DATA
71
INDIVIDUAL SINGLE STARS
72
32 Correlations
80
33 Parallaxes
85
34 Proper motions
95
35 Disturbed solutions
100
36 Comparison with the ICRS
109
THE ASTROMETRIC DATA FOR COMPOSITE IMAGES AND ORBITAL BINARIES
113
41 The modulated signal for smallseparation double stars
114
42 Astrometric parameters for double stars
126
43 Double stars with two catalogue entries
131
44 Variablebrightness of one component
132
45 Multiple systems
135
46 Orbital motions
137
GROUPS OF SINGLE STARS
143
52 Application to star clusters
145
53 Calibrating luminosities
163
54 Conclusions
176
KINEMATICS OF THE SOLAR NEIGHBOURHOOD
177
62 The distribution of nearby stars
186
A DESCRIPTION OF THE CONTENTS AND PECULIARITIES OF THE HIPPARCOS PHOTOMETRIC DATA
196
THE PHOTOMETRIC DATA
197
72 Formal errors and variability indicators
204
73 Variability analysis
208
74 Newly discovered variables
214
HIPPARCOS ATTITUDE MODELLING
216
A FREEFLOATING RIGID BODY IN SPACE
217
82 The internal torques and inertia tensor
223
83 External torques acting on the satellite
226
84 Nonrigidity
236
THE TORQUES ON HIPPARCOS AS OBSERVED OVER THE MISSION
239
92 Solar radiation torques
241
SUMMARY OF SELECTED SPACECRAFT AND PAYLOAD CALIBRATION RESULTS
284
THE MISSION TIMELINE
285
112 Data coverage and detector response
298
PAYLOAD CALIBRATIONS
299
121 The optical transfer function
301
122 Largescale geometricdistortion calibration
304
123 Photometric calibrations
311
SPACECRAFTPARAMETER CALIBRATIONS
329
132 Gyro characteristics
335
133 Thruster firings and the Centre of Gravity
340
THE NEXT GENERATION
346
GAIA
349
143 The mission plan
352
144 The astrometric data reduction
354
145 The photometric data reduction
355
146 The spectroscopic data reduction
360
147 Dataanalysis challenges
363
148 Organization of the data processing and analysis
365
Transformations for heliotropic and TaitBryant angles
369
Spline functions
373
Linear Least Squares and Householder Orthogonal Transformations
377
Chain solutions running solutions and common parameters
381
Orbit parameters for binary stars
385
Reference orbital parameters
393
The data disk
403
G2 The science data
406
G3 Payload calibration data
410
G4 Spacecraft calibration data
416
Bibliography
419
Subject index
439
Object index
443
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