His Serene Highness

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E.P. Dutton, 1922 - 345 pages
 

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Page 27 - I AM content, I do not care, Wag as it will the world for me; When fuss and fret was all my fare, It got no ground as I could see : So when away my caring went, I counted cost, and was content. With more of thanks and less of thought, I strive to make my matters meet ; To seek what ancient sages sought, Physic and food in sour and sweet: To take what passes in good part, And keep the hiccups from the heart. With...
Page 50 - May I govern my passion with an absolute sway, And grow wiser and better as my strength wears away, Without gout or stone, by a gentle decay.
Page 18 - From change of love are only free. Then, since we mortal lovers are, Ask not how long our love will last ; But, while it does, let us take care Each minute be with pleasure past.
Page 101 - Saepibus in nostris parvam te roscida mala (dux ego vester eram) vidi cum matre legentem. alter ab undecimo tum me iam acceperat annus; iam fragilis poteram ab terra contingere ramos. 40 ut vidi ut perii, ut me malus abstulit error.
Page 38 - CONTENT I AM content, I do not care, Wag as it will the world for me ; When Fuss and Fret was all my Fare, It got no ground, as I could see : So when away my Caring went, I counted Cost, and was Content. With more of Thanks and less of Thought, I strive to make my Matters meet ; To seek what ancient sages sought, Physic and Food, in sour and sweet : To take what passes in good Part, And keep the Hiccups from the Heart.
Page 182 - A man the monarch of his mind. Now taste and try this temper, sirs, Mood it and brood it in your breast ; Or, if ye ween for worldly stirs That man does right to mar his rest, Let me be deft and debonair, I am content, I do not care l ON THE ORIGIN OF EVIL.
Page 52 - Grow wiser and better as my strength wears away, Without gout or stone, by a gentle decay. " In a country town by a murmuring brook, With the ocean at distance, on which I may look, With a spacious plain, without hedge or stile, And an easy pad nag to ride out a mile. May I govern, &c.
Page 29 - For chance or change of peace or pain, For Fortune's favour or her frown, For lack or glut, for loss or gain, I never dodge nor up nor down, But swing what way the ship shall swim, Or tack about with equal trim. I suit not where I shall not speed, Nor trace the turn of every tide. If simple sense will not succeed I make no bustling, but abide. For shining wealth or scaring woe I force no friend, I fear no foe.
Page 1 - With a pudding on Sundays, with stout humming liquor, And remnants of Latin to welcome the vicar...

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