Historical and Biographical Annals of Columbia and Montour Counties, Pennsylvania, Containing a Concise History of the Two Counties and a Genealogical and Biographical Record of Representative Families ...

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J. H. Beers & Company, 1915 - Columbia County (Pa.)
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This book contains at least several inaccurate statements about the history of the McHenry family. The book confuses Benjamin McHenry the son of Daniel McHenry the original European settler of the Fishing Creek area with Benjamin McHenry the son of Daniel Butterfield McHenry, and gets a few other details wrong along the way. 

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Page 13 - That all persons living in this province who confess and acknowledge the one almighty and eternal God to be the creator, upholder, and ruler of the world...
Page 13 - Sylvania, and they added Penn to it; and though I much opposed it, and went to the King to have it struck out and altered, he said it was past, and would take it upon him; nor could twenty guineas move the under secretary to vary the name; for I feared lest it should be looked on as a vanity in me, and not as a respect in the King, as it truly was, to my father, whom he often mentions with praise.
Page 12 - ... but if the said river shall not extend so far northward, then by the said river so far as it doth extend; and from the head of the said river, the eastern bounds are to be determined by a meridian line, to be drawn from the head of the said river, unto the said forty-third degree.
Page 12 - The said land to extend westward five degrees in longitude, to be computed from the said eastern bounds, and the said lands to be bounded on the north by the beginning of the three and fortieth degree of northern latitude, and on the south by a circle drawn at twelve miles...
Page 351 - For ye remember, brethren, our labour and travail : for labouring night and day, because we would not be chargeable unto any of you, we preached unto you the gospel of God.
Page 12 - Lands to bounded on the North by the beginning of the three and fortieth degree of Northern Latitude, and on the South by a circle drawn at twelve miles...
Page 346 - I rejoiced greatly, when the brethren came and testified of the truth that is in thee, even as thou walkest in the truth. 4 I have no greater joy than to hear that my children walk in truth.
Page 488 - Cambridge and traveled more than a hundred miles, through a hideous and trackless wilderness to Hartford. They had no guide but their compass ; made their way over mountains, through swamps, thickets and rivers, which were not passable, but with great difficulty. They had no cover but the heavens, nor any lodgings but those which simple nature afforded them.
Page 488 - Lyman is reported to have began life in the new world as a man of " considerable estate, keeping two servants." John Lyman, known as Lieutenant Lyman, born in High Ongar, September, 1623, came to New England with his father. He married Dorcas, daughter of John Plumb, of Branford, Conn. He settled in Northampton, Mass., where he resided until his death, August 20, 1690.
Page 488 - Turning now to the pages of the Scottish peerage books, we learn that this Earl of Winchester's granddaughter, Elizabeth de Quincey, was the wife of Alexander de Comyn, second Earl of Buchan, who was a descendant of Donalbane, King of Scots, which gives Dewey a " strain

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