Historical Atlas of Empires

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Mercury, 2003 - Reference - 191 pages
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The concept of 'empire' has existed since King Sargon of Akkad conquered Mesopotamia more than 4,000 years ago. Since his Akkadian dynasty many other empires have risen and fallen; Assyrian, Roman, Mongol, Aztec, Habsburg, British and Soviet -- all have held sway over far-flung territories and peoples, usually through force, and always seeking economic gain. The construction of an empire invariably meant suffering for the conquered peoples, but empires have also contributed to stability and wealth, and many have acted as catalysts for social, political and technological progress. But what drives one nation to expand and exert its influence to extend over others? With specially commissioned cartography, color illustrations and photographs, Historical Atlas of Empires explores and explains the ever-changing concept of empire from the ancient Middle East to the superpowers of the 20th century.

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Contents

Chapter OneThe First Empires 10 The Angevin Dynasty 118
16
Chapter TwoAncient Rivals 26 In Fortunes EyeVenice 132
32
Chapter ThreeThe Glorious East 46 The Habsburg Empire 154
48
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About the author (2003)

Karen Farrington is a former journalist who has contributed to numerous publications on military history. She has also written extensively on assassinations, natural disasters, & religion. Ms. Farrington's most recent works include "The Hamlyn Book of Torture & Punishment," "Witness to World War II," & "Shipwrecks.

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