History and Antiquities of the Cathedral Churches of Great Britain: St. Asaph. Bangor. Bath. Bristol. Canterbury. Carlisle

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Rivingtons, 1814 - Cathedrals
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Page 87 - Et sciendu', q' p'fati moachi in obitu meo facient seruiciu' pro me sicud p' uno moacho ; & si m' placu'it, corpus meu' recipie't ad sepulturam. Hiis t', Rob'to filio Ursy, Joh'e filio ejus, & aliis." " Know men present and future, that I, Robert, son of Hugh de Wude, have given, and granted, and by this my present charter have confirmed, to God and S.
Page 115 - III. Union in one house. Food and raiment distributed by the Superior. Every thing common. Consideration to be had of infirmity; against pride on account of difference of birth. Concord. Attention to divine service at the proper hours. Not to make other use of the Church than that it was destined to, except praying in it, out of the proper hours, when they had leisure or inclination. When psalm-singing to reA r olve it in the heart.
Page 87 - This was the mart for elaves, collected from all parts of England ; and particularly young women, whom they took care to provide with a pregnancy, in order to enhance their value. It was a most moving sight to see, in the public markets, rows of yiung people of both sexes, tied together with ropes, of great beauty, and in the flower of their youth, daily prostituted, daily sold.
Page 62 - Seventh, as his arms and supporters remain perfect at the bottom of it. The lower parts of the first division over the impost to the turrets, which are of square forms, have simple narrow openings, to light the stair-cases within them. On the upper begins the representation of the bishop's vision ; here the ladders take their rise from a kind of undulating line, expressive of the surface of the ground, and here the angels begin their ascension, though much damaged. On each side of the ladders are...
Page 62 - ... to light the stair-cases within them. On the upper begins the representation of the bishop's vision ; here the ladders take their rise from a kind of undulating line, expressive of the surface of the ground, and here the angels begin their ascension, though much damaged. On each side of the ladders are remains of figures, which have some distant resemblance to shepherds ; over them are labels, the inscriptions on which are not legible : other openings for light appear under the rounds of the...
Page 62 - King, bishop of the diocese, who, it is asserted, was prompted to the good work by a vision he beheld in his...
Page 62 - I. p. 5 19. complete, this arched head is repeated on each square, finishing with open spires corresponding with those of the turrets. The small entrances to the side-aisles are in unison, as well as the enrichments of the five wounds of our Saviour on the spandrel, with their centre entrance. The windows have a resemblance to the great one, and on the mullions of each is a statue ; that on the left is designed for our Saviour, who is pointing to the wound in his side with his one hand, and with...
Page 165 - The staff with the cross was put into his hands by a monk, commissioned by the prior and convent of Canterbury, with these words : " Reverend Father, I am sent to you from the sovereign Prince of the world, who requires and commands you to undertake the government of his church, and to love and protect her ; and in proof of my orders, I deliver you the standard of the King of Heaven.

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