History of Concord, New Hampshire: From the Original Grant in Seventeen Hundred and Twenty-five to the Opening of the Twentieth Century, Volume 1

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Rumford Press, 1896 - Canterbury (N.H.)
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Page 468 - This Convention of Delegates, assembled in pursuance of a call addressed to the people of the United States, without regard to past political differences or divisions, who are opposed to the repeal of the Missouri Compromise, to the policy of the present Administration, to the extension of Slavery into Free Territory ; in favor of admitting Kansas as a Free State, of restoring the action of the Federal Government to the principles of Washington and Jefferson...
Page 259 - ... to call a full and free representation of the people, and that the said representatives, if they think it necessary, establish such a form of government as, in their judgment, will best produce the happiness of the people and most effectually secure peace and good order in the colony during the continuance of the present dispute between Great Britain and the colonies.
Page 475 - THE CONSTITUTION OF THE COUNTRY, THE UNION OF THE STATES, AND THE ENFORCEMENT OF THE LAWS...
Page 261 - Declare that it is the opinion of this Assembly that our Delegates at the Continental Congress should be Instructed, and they are hereby Instructed to Join with the other Colonies in Declaring THE THIRTEEN UNITED COLONIES, A FREE AND INDEPENDENT STATE...
Page 260 - We, the Subscribers, do hereby solemnly engage and promise, that we will, to the utmost of our power, at the risk of our lives and fortunes, with arms, oppose the hostile proceedings of the British Fleets and Armies against the United American Colonies.
Page 260 - Resolved, That it be recommended to the several Assemblies, Conventions, and Councils, or Committees of Safety of the United Colonies...
Page 75 - ... to which I have hitherto been unwilling : but now I yield up myself to your advice, and enter into a new canoe, and do engage to pray to God hereafter.
Page 95 - Merrimac, or to the northward of any and every part thereof, and all lands and hereditaments whatsoever lying within the limits aforesaid, north and south, in latitude and breadth, and in length and longitude, of and within all the breadth aforesaid, throughout the main lands there, from the Atlantic and Western Sea and Ocean on the east part, to the South Sea...
Page 590 - For the recognition of the independence of the people of Cuba, demanding that the Government of Spain relinquish its authority and government in the island of Cuba, and to withdraw its land and naval forces from Cuba and Cuban waters, and directing the President of the United States to use the land and naval forces of the United States to carry these resolutions into effect...
Page 363 - Society shall be to discover, procure and preserve whatever may relate to the natural, civil, literary and ecclesiastical history of the United States in general, and of this State in particular.

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