History of England from the Peace of Utrecht to the Peace of Paris, Band 1

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Seite 469 - I happened soon after to attend one of his sermons, in the course of which I perceived he intended to finish with a collection, and I silently resolved he should get nothing from me. I had in my pocket a handful of copper money, three or four silver dollars, and five pistoles in gold. As he proceeded I began to soften, and concluded to give the coppers.
Seite 458 - It is come, I know not how, to be taken for granted by many persons, that Christianity is not so much as a subject of inquiry, but that it is now at length discovered to be fictitious. And accordingly they treat it as if, in the present age, this were an agreed point among all people of discernment...
Seite 8 - That after the said limitation shall take effect as aforesaid, judges commissions be made quamdiu se bene gesserint, and their salaries ascertained and established; but upon the address of both houses of parliament it may be lawful to remove them.
Seite 379 - If all be true that I do think, There are five reasons we should drink: Good wine— a friend— or being dry— Or lest we should be, by and by— Or any other reason why!
Seite 11 - God bless your majesty and the church. We hope your majesty is for Dr. Sacheverel.
Seite 456 - In flat opposition to these, I declare once more, that I live and die a member of the Church of England: and that none who regard my judgment or advice will ever separate from it.
Seite 48 - Crisis," written by Richard Steele, Esq., a member of this House, are scandalous and seditious libels, containing many expressions highly reflecting upon her Majesty, and upon the nobility, gentry, clergy, and universities of this kingdom, maliciously insinuating that the Protestant succession in the house of Hanover is in danger under her Majesty's administration...
Seite 61 - I have many children, and I " know not whether God Almighty will vouchsafe to let " me live to give them the education I could wish they "had. Therefore, my Lords, I own I tremble when I " think that a certain Divine, who is hardly suspected " of being a Christian, is in a fair way of being a Bishop, " and may one day give licences to those who shall be "intrusted with the education of youth!"* All parties looked with great interest to the conduct of the Lord Treasurer on this occasion.
Seite 437 - A critic of the present day serves a poem as a cook serves a dead turkey, when she fastens the legs of it to a post, and draws out all the sinews. For this we may thank Pope ; but unless we could imitate him in the closeness and compactness of his expression, as well as in the smoothness of his numbers, we had better drop the imitation, which serves no other purpose than to emasculate and weaken all we write. Give me a manly rough line, with a deal of meaning in it, rather than a whole poem full...
Seite 317 - Do you think I will sell you a yard of tenpenny stuff for twenty of Mr. Wood's halfpence? No, not under two hundred at least; neither will I be at the trouble of counting, but weigh them in a lump.

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