History of Indian and Eastern Archiecture

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John Murray, 1874 - Architecture
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Page 192 - And when the queen of Sheba had seen all Solomon's wisdom, and the house that he had built, and the meat of his table, and the sitting of his servants, and the attendance of his ministers, and their apparel, and his cup-bearers, and his ascent by which he went up unto the house of the Lord, there was no more spirit in her.
Page 119 - No language can convey an idea of its beauty, and no artist has yet been able to reproduce its form so as to convey to those who have not seen it an idea of its grandeur. The mass of its central piers, illumined by a flood of light from the clerestory, and the smaller pillars of the wings gradually fading into obscurity, are so arranged and lighted as to convey an idea of infinite space ; at the same time, the beauty and massiveness of the forms, and the brilliancy of their...
Page 529 - ... of decoration. So far as internal architecture is concerned, the invention of painted glass was perhaps the most beautiful ever made. The painted slabs of the Assyrian palaces are comparatively poor attempts at the same effect.
Page 70 - A love of nature seems always to have prevailed with them, and they may have known " the trees, from the cedar which is in Lebanon to the hyssop that springeth out of the wall, and the names of all the beasts, and the fowls, and the creeping things, and the fishes;" but beyond this we know of nothing that can be dignified by the name of science among the Semitic races. They more than made up however for their deficient knowledge of the exact sciences by the depth of their insight into the springs...
Page 117 - Its facade is formed by two great pylons, or pyramidal masses of masonry, which, like the two western towers of a Gothic cathedral, are the appropriate and most imposing part of the structure externally.
Page 529 - Italian churches be compared with the brilliant effects and party-coloured glories of the windows of a perfect Gothic cathedral, where the whole history of the Bible is written in the hues of the rainbow by the earnest hand of faith. Unfortunately no .cathedral retains its painted glass in anything like such completeness ; and so little is the original intention of the architects understood, that we are content to admire the plain surface of white glass, and to consider this as the appropriate filling...
Page 120 - ... beauty, and no artist has yet been able to reproduce its form so as to convey to those who have not seen it an idea of its grandeur. The mass of its central piers, illumined by a flood of light from the clerestory, and the smaller pillars of the wings gradually fading into obscurity, are so arranged and lighted as to convey an idea of infinite space ; at the same time, the beauty and massiveness of the forms, and the brilliancy of their coloured decorations, all combine to stamp this as the greatest...
Page 376 - The Roman bridges were designed on the same grand scale as their aqueducts, though from their nature they of course could not possess the same grace and lightness. This was more than compensated by the inherent solidity and the expression of power that was imparted by the Romans to all these structures. They seem to have been designed to last for ever ; and but for the violence of man, it would be hardly possible to set limits to their durability. Many still remain in...
Page 139 - Gothic architects far excelled them in constructive cleverness ; but with these exceptions no other styles can be put in competition with them. At the same time, neither Grecian nor Gothic architects understood more perfectly all the gradations of art, and the exact character that should be given to every form and every detail. Whether it was the plain flat-sided pyramid, the crowded and massive...
Page 139 - ... of one great design, and at the same time to use historical paintings, fading by insensible degrees into hieroglyphics on the one hand, and into sculpture on the other — linking the whole together with the highest class of phonetic utterance, and...

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