History of Regional Science and the Regional Science Association International: The Beginnings and Early History

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Springer Science & Business Media, Jun 18, 2003 - Business & Economics - 267 pages
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It is difficult, if not impossible, to establish the point of time at which a new field of study starts to emerge. While the date of formal organization of a society asso ciated with the field can be precisely stated, such timing says little about when and where the seeds for a field's development were planted. Also, such timing says little about the essential "why" for the development of a field and provides little understanding of the path that it traced. It is clear that the emergence of the field of regional science, like many other fields, was dependent on a particular setting as well as the pattern of events and interaction of diverse personalities who became involved. As best I can, I shall attempt in this Part I of the History to unravel the where, when and why questions in the development of Regional Science and the Regional Science Association International. Further, in the last section of this essay, I shall briefly point up some potentialities for analytical advances in the field of regional science. Also, I shall note the opportunity for leadership by regional scientists in attacking global and regional development problems, thereby to help formulate relevant policy. In this way, I hope to expose the potential for fruitful research by young scholars interested in entering the field.
 

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Contents

The Setting and Initial Events
1
2 The Emergence and Struggling Years of Regional Science
7
22 Growth of Interest in Regional Problems Informal Meetings of Regional Researchers and Promotion Efforts
11
23 Era of Conceptual Thinking and Model Development with Multidisciplinary Explorations
44
The Evolution of the Designations Regional Science Regional Science Association and the Field of Regional Science
71
The Formation of the Regional Science Association
73
The Rooting and Emergence of Regional Science as a Major Field of Study
113
The Invasion of and Extensive Expansion in Europe Concomitant with the Formation of Sections
133
My Current Thinking on the Scope and Nature of Regional Science and Opportunities for Its Advance in Basic Research and Policy Analyses
187
Memorandum on a Census Monograph on the Location of Economic Activity and Its Relation to Population
195
Request for Support of a Project in the Field of Regional Economic Studies
207
Regionalism and American Economic History Lee Benson 12951
213
Conference of the Regional Science Association 47 September 1961 Institute of Social Studies Molenstraat 27 The Hague Netherlands
221
Annual Programs in the United States 19581967 EXCEPT 1963
227
Regional Science Association Council Members
257
References
265

The Spread of Regional Science into Japan India and Latin America
153

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About the author (2003)

Charles H. Anderton is Professor of Economics at the College of the Holy Cross, Worcester, Massachusetts, where he has taught since 1986. He coedited the volume Economics of Arms Reduction and the Peace Process with Walter Isard in 1992. A former North American editor of the journal Defence and Peace Economics, Professor Anderton's research has appeared in journals such as Economic Inquiry, Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, Journal of Conflict Resolution, Conflict Management and Peace Science, and Peace Economics, Peace Science, and Public Policy, as well as the Handbook of Defense Economics, Volumes I and II.

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