History of Scituate, Massachusetts: From Its First Settlement to 1831

Front Cover
J. Loring, 1831 - Scituate (Mass. : Town) - 406 pages
1 Review
 

What people are saying - Write a review

User Review - Flag as inappropriate

Job Cole

Selected pages

Contents

I
II
2
III
6
IV
8
V
10
VI
13
VII
14
VIII
17
CXVII
260
CXX
261
CXXI
262
CXXIII
263
CXXV
264
CXXVII
265
CXXVIII
266
CXXXI
267

IX
19
X
20
XI
21
XIII
22
XIV
23
XV
24
XVI
25
XVII
26
XVIII
27
XIX
28
XX
32
XXI
39
XXII
41
XXIII
45
XXIV
55
XXV
56
XXVI
57
XXVII
64
XXVIII
70
XXIX
71
XXX
74
XXXI
75
XXXII
76
XXXIII
77
XXXIV
78
XXXV
84
XXXVI
90
XXXVII
108
XXXVIII
110
XXXIX
112
XL
113
XLI
115
XLII
131
XLIII
134
XLIV
139
XLV
141
XLVI
143
XLVII
144
XLVIII
146
XLIX
147
L
149
LI
151
LII
155
LIII
156
LIV
163
LV
165
LVI
166
LVII
170
LVIII
177
LIX
179
LX
181
LXI
182
LXII
184
LXIII
185
LXIV
187
LXV
188
LXVII
192
LXVIII
193
LXIX
195
LXX
199
LXXI
201
LXXII
209
LXXIV
210
LXXV
211
LXXVI
213
LXXVII
214
LXXVIII
215
LXXIX
216
LXXX
217
LXXXI
218
LXXXII
219
LXXXIV
220
LXXXVI
221
LXXXIX
222
XC
223
XCI
225
XCII
226
XCIII
227
XCIV
228
XCVI
229
XCVII
230
XCVIII
231
C
232
CI
235
CII
236
CIII
237
CIV
239
CVI
240
CVII
241
CIX
242
CXI
243
CXII
249
CXIII
250
CXIV
251
CXV
252
CXVI
258
CXXXII
268
CXXXIII
270
CXXXV
271
CXXXVI
272
CXXXVIII
273
CXXXIX
274
CXLI
275
CXLV
276
CXLVII
277
CXLVIII
278
CXLIX
280
CLI
281
CLIV
282
CLV
283
CLVI
284
CLVII
285
CLVIII
286
CLIX
287
CLX
288
CLXI
289
CLXIII
290
CLXIV
291
CLXV
292
CLXVI
294
CLXVII
295
CLXVIII
297
CLXIX
298
CLXX
299
CLXXI
300
CLXXII
301
CLXXIII
302
CLXXIV
303
CLXXV
304
CLXXVI
305
CLXXVII
306
CLXXVIII
307
CLXXIX
308
CLXXXII
309
CLXXXIII
311
CLXXXIV
312
CLXXXV
313
CLXXXVI
314
CLXXXVIII
315
CLXXXIX
317
CXC
318
CXCI
319
CXCII
320
CXCIII
321
CXCIV
322
CXCV
323
CXCVI
324
CXCVIII
325
CXCIX
326
CCII
327
CCIV
328
CCV
329
CCVII
330
CCVIII
331
CCIX
332
CCX
333
CCXI
334
CCXV
335
CCXVIII
336
CCXIX
337
CCXXI
338
CCXXIII
340
CCXXIV
342
CCXXV
343
CCXXVI
344
CCXXVII
345
CCXXIX
348
CCXXX
349
CCXXXI
351
CCXXXII
354
CCXXXIII
355
CCXXXIV
356
CCXXXV
358
CCXXXVI
361
CCXXXVII
362
CCXXXVIII
364
CCXXXIX
368
CCXL
369
CCXLI
375
CCXLII
377
CCXLIII
378
CCXLIV
380
CCXLV
381
CCXLVI
382
CCXLVII
383
CCXLVIII
384
CCXLIX
385
CCL
386
CCLI
389
CCLII
390
CCLIII
391

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

Popular passages

Page 200 - Ye are witnesses, and God also, how holily and justly and unblameably we behaved ourselves among you that believe, as ye know how we exhorted, and comforted and charged every one of you, as a father doth his children, that ye would walk worthy of God, who hath called you unto his kingdom and glory.
Page 207 - ... twas a taught trick to gain credit of the world for more sense and knowledge than a man was worth; and that, with all its pretensions, - it was no better, but often worse, than what a French wit had long ago defined it, - viz. 'A mysterious carriage of the body to cover the defects of the mind'; — which definition of gravity, Yorick, with great imprudence, would say, deserved to be wrote in letters of gold.
Page 372 - Ruth, let us break away from this unreasonable bondage. I will give up my religion, and thou shalt give up thine, and we will go to the church of England, and go to the Devil together.
Page 50 - TRUSTY and well beloved, we greet you well. Having been informed that several of our subjects amongst you, called Quakers, have been and are imprisoned by you, whereof some have been executed, and others, as hath been represented unto us, are in danger to undergo the like...
Page 91 - Forasmuch as the maintenance of good literature doth much tend to the advancement of the weal and flourishing state of societies and republics, this Court doth therefore order, that in whatever township in this government, consisting of fifty families or upwards, any meet man shall be obtained to teach a grammar school, such township shall allow at least twelve pounds, to be raised by rate on all the inhabitants.
Page 180 - NICHOLAS BAKER of Scituate; who, though he had but a private education, yet, being a pious and zealous man ; or, as Dr. Arrowsmith expresses it, so good a logician, that he could offer up to God a reasonable service; so good an arithmetician, that he could wisely number Ms days; and so good an orator, that he perswaded himself to be a good Christian...
Page 46 - And we moreover find that in those places where these people aforesaid, in this colony, are most of all suffered to declare themselves freely, and are only opposed by arguments in discourse, there they least of all desire to come; and we are informed that they begin to loathe this place, for that they are not opposed by the civil authority, but with all patience and meekness are suffered to say over their pretended revelations and admonitions; nor are they like or able to gain many here to their...
Page 50 - England, together with the respective crimes or offences, laid to their charge ; to the end that such course may be taken with them here, as shall be agreeable to our laws, and their demerits. And for so doing, these our letters shall be your sufficient warrant and discharge. " Given at our court at Whitehall, the 9th day of September, 1661, in the thirteenth year of our reign.
Page 91 - In 1670, the Court did freely give and grant all such profits as might or should accrue annually to the Colony for fishing with a net or seines at Cape Cod for mackerel, bass, or herrings, to be improved for and towards a free school, in some town in this jurisdiction, for the training up of youth in literature, for the good and benefit of posterity, — provided a beginning be made within one
Page 50 - ... we have thought fit to signify our pleasure in that behalf for the future ; and do hereby require, that if there be any of those people called Quakers, amongst you, now already condemned to suffer death or other corporal punishment, or that are imprisoned, and obnoxious to the like condemnation, you arc to forbear to proceed any further therein...

Bibliographic information