History of Woman Suffrage: 1900-1920

Front Cover
Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan Brownell Anthony
Fowler & Wells, 1922 - Women
 

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Contents

I
3
II
23
III
55
IV
86
V
117
VI
151
VII
193
VIII
213
XIV
398
XV
439
XVI
480
XVII
513
XVIII
550
XIX
594
XX
617
XXI
654

IX
243
X
266
XI
310
XII
332
XIII
364

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Page 179 - Have not I commanded thee? Be strong and of a good courage ; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed: for the LORD thy God is with thee whithersoever thou goest.
Page 348 - ... all just powers of government are derived from the consent of the governed.
Page 513 - But the right is more precious than peace, and we shall fight for the things which we have always carried nearest our hearts —for democracy, for the right of those who submit to authority to have a voice in their own governments, for the rights and liberties of small nations, for a universal dominion of right by such a concert of free peoples as shall bring peace and safety to all nations and make the world itself at last free.
Page 169 - Favour is deceitful, and beauty is vain: but a woman that feareth the Lord, she shall be praised. Give her of the fruit of her hands; and let her own works praise her in the gates.
Page 83 - Just as surely as the North will be forced to turn to the South for the nation's salvation, just so surely will the South be compelled to look to its Anglo-Saxon women as the medium through which to retain the supremacy of the white race over the African.
Page 178 - Logically, their electorate should be made up of those who can bear a valiant part in this arduous contest, those who in the past have at least attempted to care for children, to clean houses, to prepare foods, to isolate the family from moral dangers; those who have traditionally taken care of that side of life which inevitably becomes the subject of municipal consideration and control as soon as the population is congested. To test the elector's fitness to deal with this situation by his ability...
Page 298 - When the white man governs himself, that is selfgovernment; but when he governs himself and also governs another man, that is more than selfgovernment — that is despotism. If the negro is a man, why then my ancient faith teaches me that "all men are created equal," and that there can be no moral right in connection with one man's making a slave of another.
Page 23 - Suffrage Associations of fourteen countries have been invited to send delegates. The principles which for a century have stood as the guarantee of political liberty to American men, " Taxation without representation is tyranny," and "Governments derive their just powers from the consent of the governed...
Page 497 - Constitution that it had been successfully operated, because the Americans could run any constitution. But there have been a great many technical difficulties in running it. And then something happened. A great question arose in this country which, though complicated with legal elements, was at bottom a human question, and nothing but a question of humanity. That was the slavery question. And is it not significant that it was then, and then for the first time, that women became prominent in politics...
Page 222 - Resolved, That it is the duty of the women of this country to secure to themselves their sacred right to the elective franchise.

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