History of Domestic and Foreign Commerce of the United States: pt. I. The foreign trade of the United States since 1789, by G. G. Huebner. pt. II. The fisheries, by T. W. Van Metre. pt. III. Government aid and commercial policy, by D. S. Hanchett

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Page 142 - the canal shall be free and open to the vessels of commerce and of war of all nations observing these rules, on terms of entire equality, so that there shall be no discrimination against any such nation, or its citizens or subjects, in respect of the conditions or charges of traffic, or otherwise.
Page 233 - that the inhabitants of the United States should have the "liberty to take fish on that part of the southern coast of Newfoundland which extends from Cape Ray to the Rameau Islands, on the Western and Northern coast of Newfoundland from the said Cape Ray to the Quirpon Islands, and also on the Coasts, Bays,
Page 398 - 46; facilities, extension of, 1830-1860, I, 227; inland, in 1789, I, 203; organization of, I, 296; public regulation of, since 1900,1,319. Treasurer and Company of Adventurers and Planters of the City of London for the First Colony of Virginia, The, i, 21. Treasury, Department of the, commercial functions of, n, 246. Treaties, commercial, of the United States,
Page 142 - whether by canal or railway, across the isthmus which connects North and South America, and especially to the interoceanic communications, should the same prove to be practicable, whether by canal or railway, which are now proposed to be established by the way of Tehuantepec or Panama.
Page 233 - that part of the southern coast of Newfoundland which extends from Cape Ray to the Rameau Islands, on the Western and Northern coast of Newfoundland from the said Cape Ray to the Quirpon Islands, and also on the Coasts, Bays, Harbours, and Creeks from Mount Joly on the Southern Coast of Labrador to and through the Straits of Belleisle, and thence
Page 140 - the navigation of the river Mississippi, from its source to the ocean, shall for ever remain free and open to the subjects of Great Britain and the citizens of the United States.
Page 226 - 36th parallel of north latitude, and on the shores of the several islands thereunto adjacent, and in the bays, harbors, and creeks of the said seacoasts and shores of the United States and of the said islands." The treaty was to last for a fixed period of
Page 237 - 5. Has the United States any right, and if so, what right of protection or property in the fur-seals frequenting the islands of the United States in Bering Sea when such seals are found outside the ordinary three-mile limit? The award
Page 233 - the limits of exclusion shall be drawn three miles seaward from a straight line across the bay in the part nearest the entrance at the first point where the width does not exceed ten miles.
Page 142 - at no time shall higher charges be made on the transit of persons and property of citizens of the United States than may be made on the persons and property of other foreign nations, nor shall any interest in said transit way, nor in the proceeds thereof, be transferred to any foreign government.

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