History of Painting, Volume 1

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Dodd, Mead,, 1880 - Painting - 703 pages
 

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Page 28 - ... she saw men pourtrayed upon the wall, the images of the Chaldeans pourtrayed with vermilion, girded with girdles upon their loins, exceeding in dyed attire upon their heads, all of them princes to look to, after the manner of the Babylonians of Chaldea, the land of their nativity...
Page 167 - Nilus (AD 450) was consulted about the decoration of a church, he rejected as childish and unworthy the intended design of plants, birds, animals, and a number of crosses, and desired the interior to be adorned with pictures from the Old and New Testament, with the same motive that Gregory II.
Page 492 - O ye faithful, of a truth wine, gaming, images, and the casting of lots are things to be held in abhorrence." The text then goes on to denounce idolatry, and makes it clear that by images are understood the works of sculpture only. It is in the oral utterances attributed by tradition to the Prophet that the passage for the first time occurs, " Woe unto him who paints the likeness of a living thing ; on the Day of Judgment those whom he has depicted will rise up out of the grave and ask him for their...
Page 454 - Dante to have been called seimia della natura, the ape of nature, which seems to refer to the strong realistic tendencies common to the school. Many other artists mentioned by our authorities have also become mere names for us ; for instance, Giotto's pupil Puccio Capanna, of whose pictures in the choir of S. Francesco at Pistoia only fragments remain ; and again Buonamico Cristofani — called Buffalmaeeo, a contemporary Florentine, who did not belong to the school of Giotto, but, according to Ghiberti,...
Page 67 - He was the first to bring in a singularly delightful fashion of wall-painting ; villas, colonnades, examples of landscape-gardening, woods and sacred groves, reservoirs, straits, rivers, coasts, all according to the heart's desire ; and amidst them passengers of all kinds on foot, in boats, driving in carriages or riding on asses to visit their country properties ; furthermore fishermen, bird-catchers, hunters, vintagers ; or, again, he exhibits stately villas, to which the approach is through a...
Page 46 - ... natural scenery, should place at the disposal of painting, in all its uses, that mode of representation with which the public was already familiar in stage use alone. Such a figure-painter in fact arose among the Greeks towards the end of the fifth century BC, at the beginning of the Peloponnesian wars, in the person of Apollodoros the Athenian. Those ancient writers, who, like Pliny, treat the history of painting from a technical point of view, speak of Apollodoros as the first painter worthy...
Page 450 - ... permitted some slightness of treatment, but they show complete certainty in the effect of colour, admirable composition although in a narrow space, and in all points a masterly attainment, by simple means, of the desired object. The difference between the sculptor Giovanni Pisano and his father Niccola is greater than the difference between the painter Giotto and his teacher Cimabue. The simple style founded by Niccola on the study of the antique was followed, in the work of Giovanni, by an adoption...
Page 38 - Andromache, and the veil of Hera, in which are many a " wondrous image " of Athene's weaving. And in the Odyssey we hear of the rich embroidery on the front of the garment of Ulysses : — About the skirts a hound a freckled hind In full course hunted ; on the foreskirts, yet, He pinch'd and pull'd her down, when with her feet And all her force she struggled hard for flight, Which had such life in gold, that to the sight It seem'd the hind itself for every hue, The hound and all so answering the...
Page 423 - ... names of illuminators ; Oderigi of Gubbio ; Franco of Bologna ; Don Silvestro — Examples of their age and spirit, but not of their hands — Bologna a chief seat of the art — Illuminated MSS. of Dante and Petrarch — Sicilian fourteenth century MS. — Italian illuminators in the employ of French patrons — CONCLUSION. IN the Gothic as in the two preceding periods, Italian painting demands to be separately considered, since both as to conceptions and technical methods it followed lines...
Page 217 - Italy ; but at the same t1me it exhibited an original tendency, not content with repeating over and over again some rigidly established scheme of figures and combinations, but endeavouring to realise the appearances of living action and purpose. What fettered this endeavour was the low stage of knowledge. The figure had been released from the Irish system of flourishes and convolutions, but ignorance of form and of perspective hindered artists from clearly representing things as they were, in spite...

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