History of Peace: Comp. from Governmental Records, Official Reports, Treaties, Conventions, Peace Conferences and Arbitrations. And the Writings and Speeches of the Most Eminent and Distinguished Authors and Historians, with Recitations, Hymns and Poems

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History of Peace Publishing Company, 1902 - Arbitration (International law) - 372 pages
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Page 260 - if ye have love one to another." "Walk with all lowliness and meekness, with long suffering, forbearing one another in love." "Be ye all of one mind, having compassion one of another; love as brethren, be pitiful, be courteous; not rendering evil for evil, or railing for railing." "Be at peace among yourselves. See that none
Page 15 - solicitude to cultivate the best understanding with his government. In the discussions to which this interest has given rise and in the arrangements by which they may terminate, the occasion has been judged proper for asserting, as a principle in which the rights and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free
Page 265 - throbbed no longer, and the battleflags were furled, In the Parliament of Man, the federation of the world: There the common sense of most shall hold a fretful realm in awe, And the kindly earth shall slumber, lapped in universal law.
Page 16 - defense of our own, which has been achieved by the loss of so much blood and treasure, and matured by the wisdom of their most enlightened citizens, and under which we have enjoyed unexampled felicity, this whole nation is devoted. -We owe it, therefore, to candor and to the amicable relation existing between the United States and those
Page 5 - forevermore the curse of Cain! Down the dark future, through long generations, The echoing sounds grow fainter and then cease; And, like a bell, with solemn, sweet vibrations, I hear once more the voice of Christ say, "Peace!" Peace ! and no longer from its
Page 274 - the curse of Cain! Down the dark future, through long generations, The echoing sounds grow fainter and then cease; And like a bell, with solemn, sweet vibrations, I hear once more the voice of Christ say, "Peace!" Peace! and no longer from its
Page 16 - But with the movements in this hemisphere we are of necessity more immediately connected, and by causes which must be obvious to all enlightened and impartial observers. The political system of the allied powers
Page 282 - No hostile chiefs to furious combat ran; But peaceful was the night, In which the Prince of light His reign of peace upon the earth began. No conqu'ror's sword He bore, Nor war-like armor wore, Nor haughty passions
Page 13 - asunder, The rattling musketry, the clashing blade ; And ever and anon, in tones of thunder, The diapason of the cannonade. Is it, O man, with such discordant noises, With such accursed instruments as these, Thou drownest Nature's sweet and kindly voices, And jarrest the celestial harmonies?
Page 34 - War, he sung, is toil and trouble ; Honor but an empty bubble; Never ending, still beginning, Fighting still, and still destroying; If the world be worth thy winning, Think, oh, think it worth enjoying. —Dryden: Alexander's Feast.

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