History of the Democratic Party Organization in the Northwest, 1824-1840

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F. J. Heer Printing Company, 1915 - Northwest, Old - 120 pages
 

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Page 22 - Ibid, Feb. 7, 1828. I 24 Ohio Arch, and Hist. Society Publications. organizing, a committee of fourteen, consisting of one member from each congressional district, was appointed to consult with delegates from their respective districts, and recommend to the convention the names of sixteen persons for nomination as electors of president and vice-president of the United States at the next election.84 Another committee of fourteen members was appointed to prepare an address...
Page 67 - Whigs opposed the new institution ; they declared it "was intended to abridge the liberties of the people by depriving individuals, on their own mere motion, of the privilege of becoming candidates and depriving each man of the right to vote for a candidate of his own selection and choice.
Page 24 - A committee of two delegates from each judicial district was appointed to advance the election of Jackson and to report to the convention the names of proper persons to constitute a central committee of correspondence and such other committees as might be deemed necessary throughout the state.100 In accordance with their report a "committee of general superintendence...
Page 84 - A movement for another convention was therefore soon on foot which assumed to represent the whole people, though in fact originating in the caucuses of the Jackson party and representing that party almost exclusively." The delegates convened and "with no more authority than any party caucus, assumed the sovereign power of accepting the proposition of congress. No pretense could be more baseless than this assumption of authority by the convention. People ridiculed its meeting and christened it the...
Page 76 - At this time there were about sixty counties in the state and twenty-three of these were represented in the convention by seventy delegates. The rules for the government of the house of representatives of Illinois were adopted for the government of the convention. A committee appointed by the president, consisting of one from each county represented, selected the five candidates for presidential electors who should vote for Van Buren and Johnson. An address was prepared to the people of the state....
Page 9 - ... and temporary succession to the powers and duties of public offices, of whatever nature and whether filled by election or appointment, the incumbents of which may become unavailable for carrying on the powers and duties of such offices, and to adopt such other measures as may be necessary and proper for insuring the continuity of governmental operations, including changes in quorum requirements in the legislature and the relocation of the seat of government.
Page 18 - National Republican, Oct. 2. 1827. "Ibid, Sept. 4. 1827; Cincinnati Daily Gazette, Sept. 13, 1827. " US Telegraph, Apr. 14, 1827. quoting National Republican. " US Telegraph, May 5, 1827 ; National Republican. May 15. 1827 M Cincinnati Daily Gazette, Oct. 7, 1827. success seemed probable. "In most of the counties there is a large number of candidates and many will probably be elected without receiving one-third of the votes actually given. It is easy in such cases for a small minority of Jacksonians,...
Page 29 - that the several ward and township committees in this county be requested to appoint a fund committee in their respective wards and townships, for the purpose of receiving such contributions as may be given to promote the election of General Jackson, and that the same be paid over to the treasurer of the general committee of the county."138 In Richland township, Belmont County, a Jackson meeting in September resolved, "that Mr.
Page 65 - The Democrats of the state however rejoiced in the national victory of their party and seemed oblivious to the local defeat. A movement was at once begun to celebrate the national victory and in addition to immediate demonstrations, the ninth of the following January, (the eighth being Sunday) was set apart for a Democratic Jubilee at Columbus and various other places in the state, which was duly observed by speeches and feasting.156 w Ohio State Journal, Oct. 22, 1836. "'Niles
Page 66 - ... disapprove of the convention system attempted to be forced upon the American people by the Van Buren party and believe it to be destructive of the freedom of the elective franchise, opposed to republican institutions, and dangerous to the liberties of the people...

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