History of the Inductive Sciences from the Earliest to the Present Time, Volume 1

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D. Appleton, 1859 - Science
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Page 340 - There it was that I found and visited the famous Galileo, grown old, a prisoner to the Inquisition for thinking in astronomy otherwise than the Franciscan and Dominican licensers thought.
Page 151 - Rather admire; or if they list to try Conjecture, he his fabric of the Heavens Hath left to their disputes, perhaps to move His laughter at their quaint opinions wide Hereafter, when they come to model Heaven And calculate the stars, how they will wield The mighty frame; how build, unbuild, contrive To save appearances; how gird the sphere With centric and eccentric scribbled o'er, Cycle and epicycle, orb in orb...
Page 384 - Descend from Heaven Urania, by that name If rightly thou art called, whose voice divine Following, above the Olympian hill I soar, Above the flight of Pegasean wing.
Page 562 - Indian race, from the mouth of the St. Lawrence to the mouth of the Mississippi, had become estranged from the English and friendly to the French.
Page 184 - Heaven before, Shrinks to her second cause, and is no more. Physic of metaphysic begs defence, And metaphysic calls for aid on sense! See mystery to mathematics fly! In vain! they gaze, turn giddy, rave, and die. Religion...
Page 421 - As in a theatre, the eyes of men, After a well-graced actor leaves the stage, Are idly bent on him that enters next, Thinking his prattle to be tedious : Even so, or with much more contempt, men's eyes Did scowl on Richard; no man cried, "God save him...
Page 275 - The Discovery of a New World ; or, a Discourse tending to prove that it is probable there may be another habitable World in the Moon ; with a Discourse concerning the possibility of a passage thither.
Page 556 - We see it as Columbus saw America from the shores of Spain. Its movements have been felt, trembling along the far-reaching line of our analysis, with a certainty hardly inferior to that of ocular demonstration.
Page 402 - ... on the summits of the highest mountains, it appeared to him reasonable to conclude that this power must extend much farther than was usually thought. ' Why not as high as the moon ?' said he to himself ; and if so, her motion must be influenced by it ; perhaps she is retained in her orbit thereby.
Page 184 - Before her Fancy's gilded clouds decay, And all its varying rainbows die away. Wit shoots in vain its momentary fires The meteor drops, and in a flash expires. As one by one, at dread Medea's strain, The sickening stars fade off th' ethereal plain ; As Argus

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