History of the Negro Race in America from 1619 to 1880: Negroes as Slaves, as Soldiers, and as Citizens; Together with a Preliminary Consideration of the Unity of the Human Family, an Historical Sketch of Africa, and an Account of the Negro Governments of Sierra Leone and Liberia, Volume 1

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G.P. Putnam's Sons, 1882 - African Americans - 611 pages
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Contents

I
xvii
II
8
V
18
VII
22
VIII
30
IX
41
X
46
XI
62
XXIV
245
XXV
248
XXVI
258
XXVII
278
XXIX
285
XXX
298
XXXI
305
XXXII
308

XIII
81
XIV
91
XV
104
XVI
111
XX
130
XXI
168
XXII
216
XXIII
234
XXXIII
312
XXXIV
320
XXXV
359
XXXVI
366
XXXVII
381
XXXIX
398
XL
408
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Page xii - And the Lord God took the man, and put him into the garden of Eden to dress it and to keep it.
Page 201 - And he that stealeth a man, and selleth him, or if he be found in his hand, he shall surely be put to death.
Page xiii - Therefore is the name of it called Babel ; because the Lord did there confound the language of all the earth : and from thence did the Lord scatter them abroad upon the face of all the earth.
Page xiii - Go to, let us go down, and there confound their language, that they may not understand one another's speech." So the Lord scattered them abroad from thence upon the face of all the earth : and they left off to build the city.
Page xii - And the Lord said, Behold, the people is one, and they have all one language; and this they begin to do: and now nothing will be restrained from them, which they have imagined to do. Go to, let Us go down, and there confound their language, that they may not understand one another's speech.
Page 373 - All territory, places and possessions whatsoever taken by either party from the other during the War, or which may be taken after the signing of this Treaty excepting only the Islands hereinafter mentioned shall be restored without delay and without causing any destruction or carrying away any of the Artillery or other public property originally captured in the said forts or places and which shall remain therein upon the Exchange of the Ratifications of this Treaty or any Slaves or other private...
Page 201 - ... and hath made of one blood all nations of men for to dwell on all the face of the earth, and hath determined the times before appointed and the bounds of their habitation ; that they should seek the Lord, if haply they might feel after him and find him, though he be not far from every one of us. For in him we live and move and have our being ; as certain also of your own poets have said, For we are also his offspring.
Page 392 - That all men are born equally free and independent, and have certain natural, inherent and unalienable rights, among which are, the enjoying and defending life and liberty, acquiring, possessing and protecting property, and pursuing and obtaining happiness and safety.
Page 196 - The state of slavery is of such a nature, that it is incapable of being introduced on any reasons, moral or political, but only by positive law...
Page 385 - ... all men are created equal; and are endowed by their Creator with certain inalienable rights; and that among these are, life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness...

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