History of the United States of America: From the Discovery of the Continent [to 1789], Volume 6

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Appleton, 1885 - United States
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Contents

17821783
36
Washingtons tour to the West
46
The unfair offers of Fox to America Jay and the slavetrade
47
Fox and reform The new colonial system of Great Britain
53
He is supported by North Carolina
54
CHAPTER V
59
The king of England invites a cordial understanding with France
60
Inflexibility of Washington
68
CHAPTER VI
70
Morris claims representation for property
72
Result of the meeting What congress did for the army News of peace
77
Public opinion on paper money
78
On interior trade On the state of Ohio
82
The constitution in the Delaware legislature
84
IION THE WAY TO A FEDERAL CONVENTION 17831787
106
VIRGINIA STATESMEN LEAD TOWARD A BETTER UNION
110
History of the clause against slavery
118
17841785
125
Four motives to union
126
Honors decreed to Washington by Virginia
132
CHAPTER IV
136
The objections of Richard Henry
144
Report of the committee of detail
149
England will not treat except on the condition of a preference
152
Of a university No state to trespass on the rights of another state
153
The constitution a government by the people
172
CONGRESS CONFESSES ITS HELPLESSNESS
177
His sympathy for the Irish and the Greeks
185
The distribution of representation
190
Followed by Nathan Dane
197
THE Federal coNVENTION
205
Limited power of the delegates from Delaware
215
Appointment of judges
237
THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT OF THE UNITED STATES
242
The tenure of good behavior considered
245
Are the states in danger? The equality of the small states defended
247
The constitution ordered to be engrossed
253
THE ADJUSTMENT OF REPRESENTATION
255
Number of representatives
257
Movement against the slavetrade Two classes of slave states
264
THE OUTLINE OF THE CONSTITUTION COMPLETED AND REFERRED
270
Qualifications of membership Discrimination against the foreignborn
272
The small states dissatisfied The plan of Connecticut
274
Character of Rutledge
276
States not to treat with foreign powers or other states
278
Congress quiets the Indian title to a great part of Ohio
285
The universal love of union Intercitizenship
322
July August and September 1787
326
Cutler before congress Carringtons report
340
The mode of counting in Massachusetts preferred to that of Virginia
341
The choice of the president by the vote of the states negatived
344
Report on the federal judiciary
348
CHAPTER XI
357
CHAPTER I
371
Its clauses
376
Events overruled by justice General desire for a closer union
377

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Page 472 - Heaven itself has ordained; and since the preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the republican model of government, are justly considered as .deeply, perhaps as finally staked, on the experiment intrusted to the hands of the American people.
Page 218 - Confederation, and moreover to legislate in all cases to which the separate States are incompetent, or in which the harmony of the United States may be interrupted by the exercise of individual legislation ; to negative all laws passed by the several States contravening, in the opinion of the National Legislature, the Articles of Union, or any treaty subsisting under the authority of the Union...
Page 148 - I have done nothing in the late Contest, but what I thought myself indispensably bound to do, by the Duty which I owed to my People. I will be very frank with you. I was the last to consent to the Separation, but the Separation having been made and having become inevitable, I have always said, as I say now, that I would be the first to meet the Friendship of the United States as an independent Power.
Page 106 - With a heart full of love and gratitude, I now take leave of you ; I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy as your former ones have been glorious and honorable.
Page 390 - Under the Articles of Confederation each State retained its sovereignty, freedom and independence, and every power, jurisdiction and right not expressly delegated to the United States.
Page 321 - I congratulate you, fellow-citizens, on the approach of the period at which you may interpose your authority constitutionally, to withdraw the citizens of the United States from all further participation in those violations of human rights which have been so long continued on the unoffending inhabitants of Africa, and which the morality, the reputation, and the best interests of our country, have long been eager to proscribe.
Page 374 - That the said report, with the resolutions and letter accompanying the same, be transmitted to the several legislatures, in order to be submitted to a convention of delegates, chosen in each State by the people thereof, in conformity to the resolves of the convention made and provided in that case.
Page 158 - That no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief...
Page 45 - The time shall come, when, free as seas or wind, Unbounded Thames shall flow for all mankind, Whole nations enter with each swelling tide, And seas but join the regions they divide; Earth's distant ends our glory shall behold, And the new world launch forth to seek the old.
Page 365 - On the whole, sir, I cannot help expressing a wish that every member of the Convention, who may still have objections to it, would with me, on this occasion, doubt a little of his own infallibility and, to make manifest our unanimity, put his name to this instrument.

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