History of the United States of America, from the Discovery of the Continent, Volume 6

Front Cover
D. Appleton, 1884 - United States
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Contents

CHAPTER IV
54
CHAPTER V
59
Inflexibility of Washington
68
CHAPTER VI
70
Washingtons meditations His appeal to the governor of Virginia
77
Washington examines the inland water communications of New York
82
The constitution in the Delaware legislature
84
CHAPTER I
89
The effect
100
CHAPTER II
110
History of the clause against slavery
118
National measures of Virginia
122
CHAPTER VII
125
Four motives to union
126
Jefferson describes the United States as one nation
132
CHAPTER IV
136
Instructions to the Massachusetts delegates
143
John Adams and King George
148
Report of the committee of detail
149
Of a university No state to trespass on the rights of another state
153
CHAPTER V
154
Before May 1787
167
The constitution a government by the people
172
Public opinion on paper money
177
Of Washington Hesitation of Virginia
185
Report on the federal judiciary
190
Followed by Nathan Dane
196
The preparation of Washington for the convention
203
Randolph proposes an executive of three members
222
The requirement of an oath
229
Character of Roger Sherman
231
Wilson speaks for the general government and the state governments
245
The constitution ordered to be engrossed
253
He is supported by North Carolina
255
Number of representatives
257
Movement against the slavetrade Two classes of slave states
264
THE OUTLINE OF THE CONSTITUTION COMPLETED AND REFERRED
270
Qualifications of membership Discrimination against the foreignborn
272
Character of Rutledge
276
States not to treat with foreign powers or other states
278
CHAPTER VIII
311
The universal love of union Intercitizenship
322
CHAPTER IX
326
Cutler before congress Carringtons report
340
Organization of federal courts
341
Report of the committee
344
CHAPTER X
348
Senate to try impeachments To cases beginning and ending in a state
357
THE CONSTITUTION IN CONGRESS AND IN VIRGINIA
371
Events overruled by justice General desire for a closer union
377
The president to be voted for in the electoral colleges of the states
389

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Page 472 - Heaven itself has ordained; and since the preservation of the sacred fire of liberty, and the destiny of the republican model of government, are justly considered as .deeply, perhaps as finally staked, on the experiment intrusted to the hands of the American people.
Page 126 - The Western States (I speak now from my own observation) stand as it were upon a pivot. The touch of a feather would turn them any way.
Page 292 - We, the people of the States of New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Providence Plantations, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia, do ordain, declare and establish, the following Constitution for the government of ourselves, and our posterity : ARTICLE I.
Page 218 - Confederation, and moreover to legislate in all cases to which the separate States are incompetent, or in which the harmony of the United States may be interrupted by the exercise of individual legislation ; to negative all laws passed by the several States contravening, in the opinion of the National Legislature, the Articles of Union, or any treaty subsisting under the authority of the Union...
Page 161 - They are now at full liberty simply to follow the Scriptures and the primitive church. And we judge it best that they should stand fast in that liberty wherewith God has so strangely made them free.
Page 148 - I have done nothing in the late Contest, but what I thought myself indispensably bound to do, by the Duty which I owed to my People. I will be very frank with you. I was the last to consent to the Separation, but the Separation having been made and having become inevitable, I have always said, as I say now, that I would be the first to meet the Friendship of the United States as an independent Power.
Page 106 - With a heart full of love and gratitude, I now take leave of you ; I most devoutly wish that your latter days may be as prosperous and happy as your former ones have been glorious and honorable.
Page 390 - Under the Articles of Confederation each State retained its sovereignty, freedom and independence, and every power, jurisdiction and right not expressly delegated to the United States.
Page 374 - That the said report, with the resolutions and letter accompanying the same, be transmitted to the several legislatures, in order to be submitted to a convention of delegates, chosen in each State by the people thereof, in conformity to the resolves of the convention made and provided in that case.
Page 158 - That no man shall be compelled to frequent or support any religious worship, place or ministry whatsoever, nor shall be enforced, restrained, molested, or burthened in his body or goods, nor shall otherwise suffer on account of his religious opinions or belief...

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