History of the Early Settlement and Indian Wars of Western Virginia: Embracing an Account of the Various Expeditions in the West, Previous to 1795 ; Also, Biographical Sketches

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H. Hoblitzell, 1851 - Indians of North America - 416 pages
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Contents

I
17
II
20
III
27
IV
33
V
36
VI
41
VII
43
VIII
48
XVIII
135
XIX
142
XX
150
XXI
154
XXII
168
XXIII
170
XXIV
174
XXV
179

IX
52
X
58
XI
73
XII
80
XIII
90
XIV
105
XV
115
XVI
121
XVII
131
XXVI
182
XXVII
189
XXVIII
194
XXIX
197
XXX
201
XXXI
282
XXXII
331
XXXIII
338
XXXIV
372

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Page 161 - I appeal to any white man to say, if ever he entered Logan's cabin hungry, and he gave him not meat ; if ever he came cold and naked, and he clothed him not?
Page 54 - This was a whole day's work, we next got it launched then went on board of it and set off. But before we were half way over we were jammed in the ice in such a manner that we expected every moment our raft to sink and ourselves to perish.
Page 161 - There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it : I have killed many : I have fully glutted my vengeance : for my country I rejoice at the beams of peace. But do not harbor a thought that mine is the joy of fear. Logan never felt fear. He will not turn on his heel to save his life. Who is there to mourn for Logan ? — Not one...
Page 40 - And we do further strictly enjoin and require all persons whatever, who have either wilfully or inadvertently seated themselves upon any lands within the countries above described, or upon any other lands which, not having been ceded to or purchased by us, are still reserved to the said Indians as aforesaid, forthwith to remove themselves from such settlements.
Page 113 - The supplicating tears of the women and moving petitions of the men melt me into such deadly sorrow, that I solemnly declare, if I know my own mind, I could offer myself a willing sacrifice to the butchering enemy, provided that would contribute to the people's ease.
Page 97 - As it was requisite, too, for the hunter to know the cardinal points, he had only to observe the trees to ascertain them. The bark of an aged tree is thicker and much rougher on the north than on the south side. The same thing may be said of the moss, it is much thicker and stronger on the north than on the south sides of the trees.
Page 54 - I put out my setting pole to try to stop the raft, that the ice might pass by, when the rapidity of the stream threw it with so much violence against the pole, that it jerked me out into ten feet water; but I fortunately saved myself by catching hold of one of the raft logs. Notwithstanding all our efforts, we could not get to either shore, but were obliged, as we were near an island, to quit our raft and make to it.
Page 160 - When he arose, he was in no wise confused or daunted, but spoke in a distinct and audible voice, without stammering or repetition, and with peculiar emphasis. His looks, while addressing Dunmore, were truly grand and majestic ; yet graceful and attractive. I have heard the first orators in Virginia, — Patrick Нету and Richard Henry Lee, — but never have I heard one whose powers of delivery surpassed those of Cornstalk.
Page 92 - ... a decent way of going barefooted ;" and such was the fact, owing to the spongy texture of the leather of which they were made. Owing to this defective covering of the feet, more than to any other circamstance, the great number of our hunters and warriors were afflicted with the rheumatism in their limbs.
Page 161 - Logan, not sparing even my women and children. There runs not a drop of my blood in the veins of any living creature. This called on me for revenge. I have sought it: I have killed many: I have fully glutted my vengeance. For my country, I rejoice at the beams of peace; but do not...

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