History of the Modern Styles of Architecture, Volume 2

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Page 45 - ... very difficult to match in any other steeple. There is no greater proof of Wren's genius than to observe that, after he had set the example, not only has no architect since his day surpassed him, but no other modern steeple can compare with this, either for beauty of outline or the appropriateness with which classical details are applied to so novel a purpose.
Page 327 - Gothic pinnacles stuck on ad libitum get over all difficulties, and satisfy himself and his employers? The perfection of Art in an American's eyes would be attained by the invention of a self-acting machine, which should produce plans of cities and designs for Gothic churches or Classic municipal buildings, at so much per foot super, and so save all further trouble or thought. The planning of cities has in America been always practically performed by these means; the process being to take a sheet...
Page 64 - Their great merit — if merit it be — is that they stamped their works with a certain amount of originality, which, had it been of a better quality, might have done something to emancipate art from its trammels. The principal characteristic of their style was the introduction of very large windows, generally without dressings. These they frequently attempted to group, three or more together, by a great glazed arch over them, so as to try and make the whole side of a house look like one room.
Page 95 - Beauclerc Tower, and Octagon Closet, and the North Bedchamber, in 1770. We now know that these are very indifferent specimens of the true Gothic Art, and are at a loss to understand how either their author or his contemporaries could ever fancy that these very queer carvings were actual reproductions of the details of York Minster or other equally celebrated buildings from which they were supposed to have been copied. " Whether correct or not, they seem to have created quite...
Page 9 - Honour, erected in 1574, and is one of the most pleasing as well as one of the most advanced specimens of the early Renaissance in England. Although its arch is slightly pointed, and the details far from being pure, the general design is very perfect. Owing to its greater height and variety of outline, it groups much more pleasingly with modern buildings than many of the more purely Classical Triumphal arches which since that time have adorned most of the capital cities of Europe.
Page 196 - The Glyptothek is one of the earliest as it is one of the best of Klenze's Munich designs. As in the Ruhmes-halle, there is a certain amount of appropriateness in a Classical, windowless building being erected to contain ancient sculptures, or modern examples executed on the same principles ; and both externally and internally this gallery is singularly well arranged for the purpose to which it was to be Olyptothek, Munich.
Page 12 - The North Platte project in Nebraska and Wyoming is one of the largest as well as one of the most successful of the reclamation projects. The Interstate...
Page 115 - ... but insists on, progress. It courts borrowing principles and forms from either. It can use either pillars or pinnacles as may be required. It admits of towers, and spires, or domes. It can either indulge in plain walls, or pierce them with innumerable windows. It knows no guide but common sense; it owns no master but true taste. It may hardly be possible, however, because it requires the exercise of these qualities; and more than this, it demands thought, where copying has hitherto sufficed;...
Page 96 - ... in France. Mr. Fergusson evidently thinks that there would be small matter for regret if Strawberry Hill had never risen above the rank of a cockney villa, or had shared the fate of Fonthill Abbey, built upon the same principle but with far more grandeur and effect. ' The fashion (he remarks) set by so distinguished a person as Horace Walpole was not long in finding followers, not only in domestic but in religious buildings. Although London was spared the infliction, Liverpool and other towns...
Page 427 - But be this as it may, the Classical is also a perfect style, and progress in it is unattainable unless we can put ourselves in the position of the Greeks or Romans when they were elaborating it; and without progress it is impossible to adapt any art really to our use or purposes. It need hardly be added that all this is even more true as regards the Saracenic, the Indian, the Chinese, or Mexican; but there is yet one other style within whose limits progress still seems possible. The Renaissance...

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