Hobbes: Leviathan: Revised Student Edition

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Cambridge University Press, Aug 28, 1996 - History - 519 pages
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Thomas Hobbes' Leviathan is arguably the greatest piece of political philosophy written in the English language. Written in a time of great political turmoil (Hobbes' life spanned the reign of Charles I, the Civil Wars, the Commonwealth and the Protectorate, and the Restoration), Leviathan is an argument for obedience to authority grounded in an analysis of human nature. Since its first publication in 1991 Richard Tuck's edition of Leviathan has been recognised as the single most accurate and authoritative text, and for this revised edition Professor Tuck has provided a much amplified and expanded introduction, which will provide students unfamiliar with Hobbes with a cogent and accessible introduction to this most challenging of texts. Other vital aids to study include an extensive guide to further reading, a note on textual matters, a chronology of important events and brief biographies of important persons mentioned in Hobbes' text.
 

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Contents

OF MAN
13
Of IMAGINATION
15
Of the Consequence or TRAYNE of Imaginations
20
Of SPEECH
24
Of REASONS and SCIENCE
31
Of the Interiour Beginnings of Voluntary Motions commonly called the PASSIONS And the Speeches by which they are expressed
37
Of the Ends or Resolutions of DISCOURSE
47
Of the VERTUES commonly called INTELLECTUALL and their contrary Defects
50
0f CIVILL LAWES
183
Of CRIMES EXCUSES and EXTENIATIONS
201
Of PUNISHMENTS and REWARDS
214
Of those things that Weaken or tend to the DISSOLUTION of a Commonwealth
221
Of the OFFICE of the Soveraign Representative
231
Of the KINGDOME of GOD BY NATURE
245
OF A CHRISTIAN COMMONWEALTH
255
Of the Number Antiquity Scope Authority and Interpreters of the Books of HOLY SCRIPTURE
260

Of the Severall SUBJECTS of KNOWLEDGE
60
Of POWER WORTH DIGNITY HONOUR and WORTHINESS
62
Of the difference of MANNERS
69
Of Religion
75
Of the NATURALL CONDITION of Mankind as concerning their Felicity and Misery
86
Of the first and second NATURALL LAWES and of CONTRACTS
91
Of other Lawes of NATURE
100
Of PERSONS AUTHORS and things Personated
111
OF COMMONWEALTH
117
Of the RIGHT of Soveraignes by Institution
121
Of the severall Kinds of COMMONWEALTH by Institution and of Succession to the Soveraigne Power
129
Of Dominion PATERNALL and DESPOTICALL
138
Of the LIBERTY of Subjects
145
Of SYSTEMS Subject Politicall and Private
155
Of the PUBLIQUE MINISTERS of Soveraign Power
166
Of the NUTRITION and PROCREATION of a Commonwealth
170
Of COUNSELL
176
Of the Signification of SPIRIT ANGEL and INSPIRATION in the Books of Holy Scripture
269
Of the Signification in Scripture of KINGDOME OF GOD Of HOLY SACRED and SACRAMENT
280
Of the WORD OF GOD and of PROPHETS
287
Of MIRACLES and their Use
300
Of the Signification in Scripture of ETERNALL LIFE HELL SALVATION THE WORLD TO COME and REDEMPTION
306
Of the signification in Scripture of the word CHURCH
320
Of the RIGHTS of the Kingdome of God in Abraham Moses the High Priests and the Kings of Judah
322
Of the OFFICE of our BLESSED SAVIOUR
332
Of POWER ECCLESIASTICALL
338
Of what is NECESSARY for a Mans Reception into the Kingdome of Heaven
402
OF THE KINGDOM OF DARKNESSE
417
Of DAEMONOLOGY and other Reliques of the Religion of the Gentiles
440
Of DARKNESSE from VAIN PHILOSOPHY and FABULOUS TRADITIONS
458
Of the BENEFIT that proceedeth from such Darknesse and to whom it accreweth
474
A REVIEW and CONCLUSION
483
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About the author (1996)

Thomas Hobbes was born in Malmesbury, the son of a wayward country vicar. He was educated at Magdalen Hall, Oxford, and was supported during his long life by the wealthy Cavendish family, the Earls of Devonshire. Traveling widely, he met many of the leading intellectuals of the day, including Francis Bacon, Galileo Galilei, and Rene Descartes. As a philosopher and political theorist, Hobbes established---along with, but independently of, Descartes---early modern modes of thought in reaction to the scholasticism that characterized the seventeenth century. Because of his ideas, he was constantly in dispute with scientists and theologians, and many of his works were banned. His writings on psychology raised the possibility (later realized) that psychology could become a natural science, but his theory of politics is his most enduring achievement. In brief, his theory states that the problem of establishing order in society requires a sovereign to whom people owe loyalty and who in turn has duties toward his or her subjects. His prose masterpiece Leviathan (1651) is regarded as a major contribution to the theory of the state.

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