Hochelaga: Or, England in the New World

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Henry Colburn, 1846 - Canada
 

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Page 183 - ... years from the date of the signature of the present convention, to the vessels, citizens, and subjects of the two Powers: it 'being well understood, that this agreement is not to be construed to the prejudice of any claim, which either of the two high contracting parties may have to any part of the said country, nor shall it be taken to affect the claims of any other Power or State to any part of the said country; the only object of the high contracting parties, in that respect, 'being to prevent...
Page 172 - ... mules died from cold, weariness, and hunger. Then the hunters, who had faced many great dangers and hardships before, became appalled ; for the snow still fell heavily and the way was far and dark before them. The next morning they consulted together, and agreed to abandon the convoy and hasten back to save their lives. An old hunter, who had served long and faithfully, and was known to be much esteemed by their leader, was chosen to state this determination to him. The delegate came forward,...
Page 183 - It is agreed that any country that may be claimed by either party on the northwest coast of America, westward of the Stony Mountains, shall, together with its harbours, bays, and creeks, and the navigation of all rivers within the same, be free and open, for the term of ten years from the date of the signature of the present convention, to the vessels, citizens, and subjects of the two Powers...
Page 221 - Manners are of more importance than laws. Upon them, in a great measure, the laws depend. The law touches us but here and there, and now and then. Manners are what vex or soothe, corrupt or purify, exalt or debase, barbarize or refine us, by a constant, steady, uniform, insensible operation, like that of the air we breathe in. They give their whole form and colour to our lives. According to their quality, they aid morals, they supply them, or they totally destroy them.
Page 187 - ... of the Columbia; several upon the Columbia itself; some to the northward and others to the southward of that river. And they navigate the Columbia as the sole channel for the conveyance of their produce to the British stations nearest the...
Page 356 - One was a grand object, with two great domes, each as large as that of St. Paul's ; the lower part was like frosted silver. Where the heat of the sun had melted the surface, and it had frozen again, in its gradual decay it had assumed all sorts of angular and fantastic shapes, reflecting from its green transparent mass thousands of prismatic colours, while, below, the gentle swell dallied with its cliff-like sides. The action of the waves had worn away a great portion of the base over the water into...
Page 263 - ... This was very true of such representatives of the British working class as James D. Burn in his book, The Working Classes in the United States. Without doubt this was to a considerable extent due to the growing English realization of the potential power of America. As Eliot Warburton wrote in 1846: "Most of the present generation among us have been brought up and lived in the idea that England is supreme in the Congress of Nations . . . but . . . this giant son will soon tread on his parent's...
Page 129 - For God and for the King !" And though they snuffled psalms, to give the rebel dogs their due, When the roaring shot poured thick and hot, they were stalwart men and true.
Page 356 - ... lay on the surface of the water. There is something impressive and dismal in the fate of these cold and lonely wanderers of the deep. They break loose, by some great effort of nature, from the shores and rivers of the unknown regions of the north, where for centuries, perhaps, they have been accumulating, and commence their dreary voyage, which has no end but annihilation. For years they may wander in the Polar Sea, till some strong gale or current bears them past its iron limits; then, by the...
Page 186 - Great Britain claims no exclusive sovereignty over any portion of that territory. Her present claim, not in respect to any part, but to the whole, is limited to a right of joint occupancy, in common with other states, leaving the right of exclusive dominion in abeyance.

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