Hocken Library Facsimile, Issue 10

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Page 10 - Some persons still affect to deride it; some say it was a deception; and some would unhesitatingly set it aside; while others esteem it highly as a well considered and judicious work, of the utmost importance to both the coloured and the white man in New Zealand. That the natives did not view all its provisions in exactly the same light as our authorities is undoubted: but whatever minor objections may be raised, the fact is now unquestionable that the loyalty, the fidelity, and co-operation of any...
Page 31 - ... landed an illiterate whaling master, who had a mere smattering of the native language, to negotiate the purchase of the whole adjoining district. With about forty men, women, and children, an arrangement was made, and goods were given to them in exchange for the whole district, as the company's agent said; but in exchange for those natives' lands, or parts of them only, in the nearest district alone, us the natives understood. The interpreter was incapable of explaining correctly what the natives...
Page 13 - Wairau gave a shock which vibrated through the length and breadth of the land. That the settler should try to take land by force of arms was a startling idea, and it at once revived every former suspicion. Until then the settlers had been supposed to be men of peace, and trade ; and the missionaries had invariably done their utmost to prevent warfare, but a new view was opened by the collision at Wairau.
Page 26 - But as the issue of paper money was in direct contravention of the governor's instructions, of course he was prepared to bear the consequences. There have been many occasions, it will not be denied, on which deviations from instructions have been productive of public benefit, however indefensible according to a general rule which must be maintained. Whether this was one of such occasions, the wretched state of the colonists in New Zealand may shew.
Page 16 - ... Wellington were seen for the first time. The port is too large to be sheltered, even from prevailing winds ; and it has a long narrow entrance from the open sea, between threatening and really dangerous rocks, making it almost a blind harbour. It is nearly surrounded by high hills covered with forests; and appears to have but little level, cultivable land in its immediate neighbourhood.
Page 16 - Port Nicholson and the town of Wellington were seen for the first time. The port is too large to be sheltered, even from prevailing winds ; and it has a long narrow entrance from the open sea, between threatening and really dangerous rocks, making it almost a blind harbour.
Page 17 - ... interior while continually exposed to the rifle of the native ; neither would they believe that no produce of the land could pay for cultivation at the point of the bayonet. The destructive effects of measures tending to bring on hostilities between the two races, seemed almost entirely discredited at Wellington and Nelson, where the feeling of animosity against the natives was so very strong that the permanent interest of the settlers — especially the scattered outsettlers — was altogether...
Page 31 - Plymouth, and landed an illiterate whaling master, who had a mere smattering of the native language, to negotiate the purchase of the whole adjoining district. With about forty men, women, and children, an arrangement was made, and goods were given to them in exchange for the whole district, as the company's agent said; but in exchange for those natives' lands, or parts of them only, in the nearest district alone, us the natives understood.
Page 25 - At the beginning of this year (1844) the local government was twenty-four thousand pounds in debt : the revenue being then estimated at about twenty thousand pounds. All salaries and ordinary current payments were several months in arrear : there was no prospect of the revenue amounting even to two-thirds of the estimated indispensable expenditure...
Page 25 - ... it was decided to issue notes, or debentures, bearing five per cent, interest after the expiration of one year; and as these debentures were at first refused by several speculators, and therefore seemed likely to be much depreciated, they were * This prohibition against drawing bills being known publicly, none could be negociated : and the credit of government being destroyed, no loan could be raised. made a legal tender.

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