Holding Government Bureaucracies Accountable

Front Cover
Greenwood Publishing Group, 1998 - Political Science - 231 pages
0 Reviews

The growth in power of government bureaucracies is one of the more profound developments of 20th-century society. Bureaucracies impact the quality of life of every person in this country and many millions outside American borders. The president, governors, mayors, legislators, judges, and the public now are increasingly concerned with how bureaucracies are using their power, and accountability is at the heart of these concerns. For what and to whom are bureaucracies accountable? This acclaimed text examines these questions, primarily in the context of the federal bureaucracy.

Building upon the second edition of the text, Rosen updated the entire work to incorporate significant subsequent developments. Among the most important are the Chief Financial Officer Act of 1990, the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993, and the Government Management Reform Act of 1994. These three laws, with the Clinton administration's National Performance Review initiative, could substantially improve performance and accountability. The text clearly and systematically examines issues of accountability that are of concern to students and researchers as well as policymakers in the area of public administration.

 

What people are saying - Write a review

We haven't found any reviews in the usual places.

Contents

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATORS ACCOUNTABLE FOR WHAT?
1
Making Laws Work as Intended
2
Exercising Lawful and Sensible Discretion
7
Initiating Changes in Policies and Programs
11
Enhancing Citizen Confidence in the Administrative Institutions of Government
14
Notes
17
PUBLIC ADMINISTRATORS ACCOUNTABLE TO WHOM?
19
The Public Administrator and the Elected Chief Executive
20
JUDICIAL REVIEW OF ADMINISTRATIVE ACTIONS
117
Power of Judicial Review
119
Activist Courts
121
The Administrative Procedure Act
123
Thousands of Cases
125
Accountability to the Justice Department
126
Personal Liability
128
The Changing Nature of Judicial Review
131

The Public Administrator and the Legislature
24
The Public Administrator and the Citizens
26
The Public Administrator and the Courts
28
The Public Administrator and the News Media
29
An Overall View
31
The Processes of Accountability
33
ACCOUNTABILITY PROCESS WITHIN THE EXECUTIVE BRANCH
35
Supervisory Direction and Review
36
The Budget Process
37
Internal Audit
42
External Evaluation
47
Special Accountability Problems in Government by Proxy
54
Notes
59
ACCOUNTABILITY MECHANISMS AND METHODS USED BY THE LEGISLATIVE BRANCH
63
Sources of Information
64
Casework
65
The Appropriations Process
66
Oversight by Standing Committees
68
Investigations
70
Hearings
71
Reporting Requirements
73
Special Oversight Roles of the House Committee on Government Reform and Oversight Formerly Committee on Government Operations and the Sen...
74
Advice and Consent
75
Legislative Audit Agencies
79
Nonstatutory Informal Oversight
82
Joint HouseSenate Investigation
84
Other Considerations
87
Notes
88
CITIZEN PARTICIPATION IN THE ACCOUNTABILITY PROCESSES
91
Public Hearings
92
Polls
93
Advisory Committees
94
Maximum Feasible Participation
97
The Ombudsman
98
Investigative Reporting
100
Special Interest Groups
103
Better Government Interest Groups
106
Summing Up
115
The Value of Judicial Review
133
Notes
134
OTHER INSTRUMENTS FOR ACCOUNTABILITY
137
Right to Privacy Laws
140
Sunshine Laws
144
Sunset Laws
145
Civil Service Reform Act
147
WhistleBlowing
153
The Inspector General Act
156
Waste and Fraud Hotline
160
Public Integrity Section US Department of Justice
161
Codes of Ethics
163
Ethics in Government Act
165
The Independent Counsel
168
Ethics and Administrative Discretion
171
Notes
172
The Future
177
NEW INITIATIVE FOR IMPROVING ACCOUNTABILITY
179
Chief Financial Officer Act of 1990
185
The Government Performance and Results Act
186
HighRisk Program Areas
193
The Single Accountability Report
194
Prompt Audit Resolution
195
Training in Ethics and Individual Responsibility
199
In the Public Interest
204
Notes
205
IN RETROSPECT
209
Executive Competence and Commitment to the Public Interest Is Essential
210
More of the Brightest and the Best Need to Be Recruited and Retained
213
Partisan Political Activity by Federal Employees
215
Understaffing and Accountability
217
Principles of Organization
218
Shared Power Shared Responsibility
220
Notes
221
Selected Bibliography
223
Index
225
Copyright

Other editions - View all

Common terms and phrases

References to this book

All Book Search results »

About the author (1998)

BERNARD ROSEN is Emeritus Distinguished Adjunct Professor in Residence at the American University School of Public Affairs. Since 1976 he has taught graduate courses in politics of administration, public management, and public personnel administration. Prior to his academic career, he was in the civil service of the federal government and served in executive positions during the administrations of five presidents. He is a Fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration.

Bibliographic information