Holding government bureaucracies accountable

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Praeger, 1998 - Business & Economics - 231 pages
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The growth in power of government bureaucracies is one of the more profound developments of 20th-century society. Bureaucracies impact the quality of life of every person in this country and many millions outside American borders. The president, governors, mayors, legislators, judges, and the public now are increasingly concerned with how bureaucracies are using their power, and accountability is at the heart of these concerns. For what and to whom are bureaucracies accountable? This acclaimed text examines these questions, primarily in the context of the federal bureaucracy. Building upon the second edition of the text, Rosen updated the entire work to incorporate significant subsequent developments. Among the most important are the Chief Financial Officer Act of 1990, the Government Performance and Results Act of 1993, and the Government Management Reform Act of 1994. These three laws, with the Clinton administration's National Performance Review initiative, could substantially improve performance and accountability. The text clearly and systematically examines issues of accountability that are of concern to students and researchers as well as policymakers in the area of public administration.

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Contents

ACCOUNTABLE TO WHOM?
19
ACCOUNTABILITY PROCESSES WITHIN THE EXECUTIVE
35
Internal Audit
42
Copyright

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About the author (1998)

Rosen id Emeritus Distinguished Adjunct Professor in Residence at the American University School of Public Affairs